BRING IT ON Add To My Top 10

Ethically Challenged

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: August 25, 2000

Starring: Kirsten Dunst, Eliza Dushku, Jess Bradford, & Gabrielle Union

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Teenagers

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 95 minutes

Address Comments To:

Edgar Bronfman, Jr., President/CEO
The Seagram Co.
Universal Pictures
100 Universal City Plaza
Universal City, CA 91608-1085
Phone: (818) 777-1000
Web Page: www.universalstudios.com

Content:

(Pa, B, Ho, C, LLL, V, S, D, M) Pagan worldview with moral elements about honesty & sportsmanship, plus minor homosexual character & minor characters shown praying & reciting the Lord’s Prayer; 30 obscenities, 7 mild profanities, 2 bleeped or silent “f” words, suggestive dialogue, suggestive lyrics, insults spread liberally, one scene with flatulence, one scene with vomiting, several obscene gestures, & some vulgar language; mild violence such as pushing, pratfalls, mother mildly slaps boy on back of head for smart remarks against sister, football game, football players fight, little girl tries to fight with older teenager, & man smashes stool; implied fornication by ex-boyfriend who’s portrayed in a negative light, suggestive dance moves, crude reference to oral sex, & one male cheerleader admits to homosexuality, then blushes when meeting male cheerleader from another squad; no nudity but females in underwear, bikinis & cheerleading outfits; no alcohol use; no smoking; and, some miscellaneous immorality, but cheerleading captain deftly deals with back-stabbing teammates & tries to right past wrongs that occurred without her knowledge.

Summary:

BRING IT ON is about the attractive new leader of a high school cheerleading squad trying to win a national championship while falling for the new boy at school. A breezy and energetic, if lightweight, teen comedy, it deals with some ethical issues in a positive way but is nevertheless spoiled by too much foul language and crude behavior.

Review:

BRING IT ON is a breezy, energetic teen comedy that’s nevertheless tempered with too much foul language and crude behavior. The best things about it are its cheerleading vignettes and the fact that the protagonist tries to overcome divisions in her cheerleading squad and to right past wrongs that occurred without her knowledge.

Kirsten Dunst stars as Torrance Shipman, who has just become captain of the cheerleading squad at Rancho Carne High School in San Diego. As a newly elected captain, she begins to learn the politics and ethics involved with competing in the Regional and National Championships. Her squad has won the nationals several years in a row, and everyone expects Torrance to bring the title home again. When she learns, however, that the previous captain has been stealing the original cheers of an African-American squad from Los Angeles, she tries to set things right. Meanwhile, Torrance finds herself falling for Cliff, the charming, funny brother of her new best friend.

Both Dunst as Torrance and Jesse Bradford as Cliff deliver appealing performances. Their relationship is relatively chaste, innocent and fun to watch. They are ably supported by the rest of the cast, including Gabrielle Union as the Los Angeles squad leader and Eliza Dushku as the gymnastically adept new best friend. Ian Roberts does a hilarious turn as a hyper choreographer whom Torrance hires to help her squad.

Although funny and cute at times, BRING IT ON lacks substance and quality. It also contains plenty of foul language and crude behavior. The movie’s heroine, Torrance, is essentially an ethical person, but those around her over-indulge in vulgar and obscene behavior, as well as many insulting sarcastic remarks. Apparently, the sweetness at the heart of the story was too much for the filmmakers to let slide without bringing in some sleaze. That’s too bad, because, without such objectionable material, BRING IT ON could have achieved a more cohesive quality of innocent fun. It may even have done a lot more to educate teenagers about honesty, ethics, Christian values, and healthy lifestyles. Perhaps one day viewers will get that kind of redemptive teen flick from a major studio, but don’t hold your breath. In the meantime, of course, pray for miracles. As the song says, our God is an awesome God.

In Brief:

BRING IT ON is a breezy, energetic teen comedy that’s tempered with too much foul language and crude behavior. Kirsten Dunst stars as Torrance Shipman, who has just become captain of the cheerleading squad at Rancho Carne High School in San Diego. As a newly elected captain, she begins to learn the politics involved with competing in the Regional and National Championships. Her squad has won the nationals several years in a row. Everyone expects her to bring home the title again. When, however, she learns that the previous captain has been stealing the team’s cheers, she tries to set things right. Meanwhile, Torrance finds herself falling for Cliff, the charming brother of her new best friend.

Both Dunst as Torrance and Jesse Bradford as Cliff deliver appealing performances, ably supported by the whole cast. Although funny and cute at times, BRING IT ON lacks substance and quality. It also contains plenty of foul language and crude behavior. The movie’s heroine, Torrance, is essentially an ethical person, but those around her indulge in vulgar behavior as well as many insulting remarks. That’s too bad, because BRING IT ON could have been innocent fun