BROKEN FLOWERS Add To My Top 10

Postmodern Ennui

Content -3
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: August 05, 2005

Starring: Bill Murray, Sharon Stone, Jeffrey Wright, Jessica Lange, Frances Conroy, Christopher McDonald, Alexis Dziena, Mark Webber, and Tilda Swinton

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 106 minutes

Distributor: Focus Features/NBC Universal/General Electric

Director: Jim Jarmusch

Executive Producer: None

Producer: Jon Kilik and Stacey Smith

Writer: Jim Jarmusch

Address Comments To:

David Linde and James Schamus
Co-President
Focus Features
100 North Crescent Drive, Garden Level
Beverly Hills, CA 90210
Phone: (310) 385-4000
Fax: (310) 385-4408
Website: www.focusfeatures.com

Content:

(PaPa, H, Cap, LL, V, SS, NNN, A, DD, M) Pagan worldview with some humanist elements and brief references to Eastern religion and philosophy, and light pro-capitalist content in that protagonist has attained financial success through his own computer business; 11 mostly strong obscenities, one strong profanity and two light profanities; man punches another man, who also gets an implied beating; implied fornication and teenager parades fully nude in front of her mom’s middle-aged former boyfriend; full female nudity in one scene and teenager in underwear; alcohol use; smoking; and, middle-aged protagonist has been promiscuous in the past and has little obvious direction in his life, despite having become a successful businessman who appears to be semi-retired.

Summary:

BROKEN FLOWERS is an adult comedy starring Bill Murray as Don Johnston, a resolutely single computer mogul who goes searching for which one of four ex-girlfriends who may have fathered his son. BROKEN FLOWERS has a dry, melancholy wit that suits Bill Murray’s talents, but it has a strong pagan worldview with strong foul language and a gratuitous scene of explicit full nudity.

Review:

Winner of the Grand Prix award at this year’s Cannes Film Festival, BROKEN FLOWERS is an adult comedy starring Bill Murray as Don Johnston, a resolutely single computer mogul. Don’s latest lover has just dumped him when a mysterious pink letter arrives and informs Don that he has a 19-year-old son who may be looking for him.

Winston, Don’s closest friend and neighbor, urges Don to go looking for the woman who wrote the letter. An amateur sleuth and family man, Winston finds out from Don the names and hometowns of four of Don’s former flames. Using the computer, Winston locates all four of the ladies and even maps out an itinerary fro Don to follow using airplanes, rental cars and hotel rooms. Reluctantly, Don begins making unannounced visits to each woman.

Directed by Jim Jarmusch, whose movies never make much money, BROKEN FLOWERS has a dry, melancholy wit that offers a good venue for Bill Murray’s talents. Jeffrey Wright is hilarious as Don’s earnest neighbor, Winston. The movie’s plot is episodic and open ended, however. BROKEN FLOWERS contains some strong foul language and an explicit nude scene, and has a pagan worldview that concludes with a Buddhist-sounding philosophy of living in the now. The worldview smacks of postmodern ennui at times, which will alienate mainstream audiences. The movie’s nudity and paganism are excessive.

In Brief:

BROKEN FLOWERS is an adult comedy starring Bill Murray as Don Johnston, a single computer mogul. Don’s latest lover has just dumped him when a mysterious pink letter informs Don that he has a 19-year-old son who may be looking for him. Winston, Don’s closest friend, urges Don to go looking for the woman who wrote the letter. An amateur sleuth and family man, Winston finds out from Don the names and hometowns of four of Don’s former flames. Using the computer, Winston locates all four of the ladies and even maps out an itinerary fro Don to follow using airplanes, rental cars and hotel rooms. Reluctantly, Don begins making unannounced visits to each woman.

Winner of the Grand Prix at this year’s Cannes Film Festival, BROKEN FLOWERS has a dry, melancholy wit that suits Bill Murray’s talents. Jeffrey Wright is hilarious as Don’s earnest neighbor, Winston. The plot is episodic and open ended, however. BROKEN FLOWERS also contains strong foul language and an explicit nude scene. It has a pagan worldview that concludes with a Buddhist-sounding philosophy of living in the now. The movie’s nudity and paganism are excessive.