CONGO

Content -2
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: June 09, 1995

Starring: Dylan Walsh, Laura Linney, Ernie Hudson, & Tim Curry

Genre: Action Adventure

Audience:

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 100 minutes

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Content:

(NA, E, FR, LL, VV, A, M) Pagan worldview with elements of environmentalism & African tribal religions; 18 obscenities, 4 profanities (one exclamatory) & 3 vulgarities; moderate violence including bloody corpses, a bloody eyeball, explosions, gunfire, & killer gorillas who rip & smash humans; alcohol use; smoking; and, two characters are motivated by extreme greed.

Summary:

The Saturday morning jungle-adventure film is back with CONGO, and all the cliches are included: lost cities containing priceless treasures, scary African natives, expeditions with scientists led by savvy locals, and countless dangers involving savage beasts. Several obscenities and gross violence will keep the young ones away, while stupid writing and acting with convoluted themes will disappoint grown-ups.

Review:

The Saturday morning jungle-adventure film is back with CONGO, and all the cliches are included. We see lost cities containing priceless treasures, scary African natives, expeditions with scientists led by savvy locals, and countless dangers involving savage beasts. Dylan Walsh plays primatologist Peter Elliot who embarks on a journey to the Virunga Volcanoes in the CONGO. His purpose is to return a remarkable gorilla named Amy to her jungle home. Joining Peter is his colleague Richard (Grant Heslov), their supposed financial sponsor, a European philanthropist named Herkermer Homolka (Tim Curry), and Karen Ross, a project supervisor for an American communications company called TraviCom. Upon arriving in Africa they are guided by Monroe Kelly (Ernie Hudson) and his team on a trek through thick jungles and dangerous waters inhabited by hungry hippos to the lost city of Zinj where they discover precious jewels and killer apes. Only a fraction of the team survives and escapes, as they make their way out as the volcano erupts.

If all this sounds entertaining, it is not. CONGO suffers from poor acting, poor script writing, and convoluted themes. Several obscenities and gross but moderate violence will keep the young ones away, while stupid writing and acting with convoluted themes will disappoint grown-ups.

In Brief: