CROSSOVER Add To My Top 10

Lowball Urban Sports Drama

Content -2
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: September 01, 2006

Starring: Anthony Mackie, Wesley Jonathan, Wayne Brady, Shelli Boone, Eva Pigford, and Alecia Jai Fears

Genre: Sports Drama

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 95 minutes

Distributor: Sony Pictures

Director: Preston Whitmore

Executive Producer: Tom Gores and Johnny Lopez

Producer: Frank Mancuso, Jr.

Writer: Preston Whitmore

Address Comments To:

Michael Lynton
Chairman and CEO
Sony Pictures Entertainment
10202 West Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232-3195
Phone: (310) 244-4000
Fax: (310) 244-2626
Web Page: www.spe.sony.com/

Content:

(PaPa, B, LL, V, S, N, A, D, M) Predominantly pagan worldview, with the movie's tagline being “Play by your own rules,” mitigated by some moral messages about honesty and not being selfish; 17 obscenities, one strong profanity and two light profanities; light violence includes man hits another man in the face, woman slaps man, and some physical contact during basketball games; scantily clad women “party” with main characters, fornication implied but not shown, and cheerleaders looking like prostitutes promote their services; scantily clad women and man and woman go swimming in their underwear; alcohol use; smoking; and, dishonesty, gambling, repeated “sharking” in basketball games to raise money, and woman lies about who fathered her child.

Summary:

CROSSOVER is about some young Detroit blacks involved in an underground type of basketball featuring minimal involvement by referees, cheerleaders who behave like lap dancers and open gambling on the game. CROSSOVER contains some positive moral messages, but the vulgarity and the shallow, sleazy portrayal of women ultimately negate whatever good the movie might accomplish.

Review:

ROSSOVER is about some young Detroit blacks involved in an underground type of basketball known as “streetball.” This form of the game features minimal involvement by referees, cheerleaders who behave like lap dancers and open gambling on the game. The inner-city slang is so thick that subtitles would have be helpful.



The movie opens with ex-sports agent Vaughn (Wayne Brady) collecting bets for a midnight game between “Enemy of the State” and “Platinum.” Enemy captain Tech (Anthony Mackie) convinces his college player friend, Cruise (Wesley Jonathan), to play on his team because he owes him a favor. Platinum (the house team) barely wins, leaving Vaughn upset that Tech brought in a ringer and almost cost him a lot of money.

Vaughn offers to be an agent for Cruise and help him make millions in the pros and on endorsements. Cruise wants to continue with college ball and become a doctor. The plot thickens to the consistency of concrete as Tech and Cruise find Eboni (Alecia Fears) and Vanessa (Eva Pigford) to party. The movie and the foursome take a detour to Los Angeles, including a visit to Sony studios.

CROSSOVER tries to honor Cruise’s grandmother and throws a bone now and then to biblical values like honesty and not being selfish. Even the message that education is more important than basketball is overshadowed by the promiscuity of the main characters. The filmmakers may actually believe they’ve made a positive, uplifting movie but the vulgarity they retain in the movie and the shallow, sleazy portrayal of women ultimately negate whatever good the movie might accomplish.

The audience for this one may be limited to those who speak “street” and see women as hunks of dark meat, light meat and hind quarters.

In Brief:

CROSSOVER is about some young Detroit blacks involved in an underground type of basketball featuring minimal involvement by referees, cheerleaders who behave like lap dancers and gambling on the game. The inner-city slang is so thick that subtitles would have be helpful. The movie opens with ex-sports agent Vaughn collecting bets for a midnight game between “Enemy of the State” and “Platinum.” Enemy captain Tech convinces his college player friend, Cruise, to play on his team because he owes him a favor. Platinum (the house team) barely wins, leaving Vaughn upset that Tech involved a ringer and almost cost him a lot of money.

CROSSOVER tries to honor Cruise’s grandmother and throws a bone now and then to values like honesty and unselfishness. Even the message that education is more important than basketball is overshadowed by the promiscuity of the main characters. The filmmakers may believe they’ve made a positive uplifting movie, but the vulgarity and the shallow, sleazy portrayal of women ultimately negate whatever good the movie might accomplish. The audience for this one may be limited to those who speak “street” lingo and who see women as hunks of meat.