DECK THE HALLS

Jesus Brings People Together

Content -1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: November 22, 2006

Starring: Danny DeVito, Matthew
Broderick, Kristin Davis,
Kristin Chenoweth, Alia
Shawkat, Dylan Blue, Sabrina
Aldridge, and Kelly Aldridge

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Older children to adults

Rating: PG

Runtime: 98 minutes

Distributor: 20th Century Fox

Director: John Whitesell

Executive Producer: Jeremiah Samuels

Producer: Arnon Milchan and Michael
Costigan

Writer: Matt Corman, Chris Ord and Don
Rhymer

Address Comments To:

Rupert Murdoch
Chairman/CEO
News Corp.
Tom Rothman and Jim Gianopulos, Chairmen/CEO
Fox Filmed Entertainment
20th Century Fox Film Corp.
A division of Fox, Inc. and News Corp.
10201 West Pico Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90035
Phone: (310) 369-1000
Website: www.fox.com

Content:

(CC, BB, Pa, LL, V, S, N, AA, M) Ultimately strong Christian worldview that overtly and reverently celebrates and extols Jesus Christ at the end, including His Divine Incarnation and Birth, with some strong moral messages about family and properly celebrating Christmas, marred by some pagan rivalry and a few crude jokes, including two fathers ogle legs of three girls from behind but go to wash out their mouths with holy water when the girls turn out to be their own daughters dressed up in Christmas outfits with short skirts; five obscenities, one strong profanity, eight light profanities, man falls into manure, and camel spits green goo on man; some slapstick comedy includes a few pratfalls, horses pulling sleigh are spooked and damage vehicles and almost run people over, sleigh flies through air and lands on icy pond, sleigh breaks trough icy pond, man shoots fireworks at neighbor's house, ice skating race with people falling down or being knocked over, and man sets fire to his own living room; a few light sexual jokes and references such as wife uses euphemism about sex when threatening husband that if he doesn't start behaving correctly he won't get the sex she had planned, boy is excited about two beautiful teenagers moving in next door, father is worried that sailors in town might take advantage of his teenage daughter, and two fathers ogle legs of girls from behind but go to wash out their mouths with holy water when the girls turn out to be their own daughters dressed up in Christmas outfits with short skirts; no explicit nudity but some revealing female cleavage and short skirts; no alcohol; no smoking; and, jealousy and rivalry rebuked, man steals power from neighbor for extreme Christmas light display, man steals mug full of hot beverage, and man tries to sabotage other man's extreme Christmas light display.

Summary:

DECK THE HALLS stars Matthew Broderick and Danny DeVito as Steve and Buddy, two family men who become rivals during the Christmas season. DECK THE HALLS is fitfully entertaining and funny, with some foul language and crude jokes, but everything comes together in the end with an overt, and reverent, celebration of the true meaning of Christmas, Jesus Christ and goodwill toward all men.

Review:

DECK THE HALLS is intended as a family comedy for Christmas. There are a few crude references, however, that make it less than ideal, but the movie's final message is very positive and even spiritually uplifting at the end. In fact, the movie extols the true Spirit of Christmas at the end.

The movie stars Matthew Broderick as Steve Finch. Steve, who supervises the town's yearly Winterfest carnival, has his family's December calendar chock full. Steve's Christmas bliss is short-lived when slippery car salesman Buddy Hall, played by Danny DeVito, moves next door.

Buddy quickly begins to undermine Steve's dominance as the local "King of Christmas" when he lavishly decorates his house with lots of glowing lights. Buddy wants his house to be visible from outer space, and Steve's bedroom.

As the two men's game of one-upmanship spirals out of control, their wives, Kelly and Tia, and their four children become increasingly irritated. Steve and Buddy just might have to spend Christmas alone, without their families.

DECK THE HALLS is fitfully entertaining and funny, and sometimes choppy. Also, there is some foul language and jokes about sexual desire. The ending could use a bigger comic buildup, but it isn't totally unfulfilling. Best of all, the ending provides the ultimate Christmas cheer. In the end, all the conflicts are resolved through real Christmas joy, including Christmas carols that extol the real reason for the season, Jesus Christ and His Divine Incarnation. One of the highlights of the movie is the whole town celebrating Christmas by singing "Oh Night Divine" about the birth of the Christ child. Thus, it becomes clear that Jesus Christ can bring people together in harmony. What can be more cheerful or fulfilling than that?

In Brief:

DECK THE HALLS stars Matthew Broderick and Danny DeVito as Steve and Buddy, two family men who become rivals during the Christmas season. Steve's Christmas bliss is short-lived when slippery car salesman Buddy movies next door. Buddy quickly challenges Steve's dominance as the local "King of Christmas" when he lavishly decorates his house with lots of glowing Christmas lights. Buddy wants his house to be visible from outer space, and Steve's bedroom. The two men's game of one-upmanship spirals out of control, and their wives, Kelly and Tia, and their four children become increasingly irritated. Steve and Buddy just might have to spend Christmas alone, without their families.

DECK THE HALLS is fitfully entertaining and funny, and sometimes choppy. Also, there is some foul language and jokes about sexual desire. The ending could use a bigger comic buildup, but it isn't totally unfulfilling. Best of all, the ending provides the ultimate Christmas cheer. In the end, all the conflicts are resolved through real Christmas joy, including Christmas carols that extol the real reason for the season, Jesus Christ and His Divine Incarnation. What can be more cheerful or fulfilling than that?