DICE RULES Add To My Top 10

Content -4
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: May 17, 1991

Starring: Andrew Dice Clay

Genre: Comedy/Concert

Audience: Adults

Rating: NC-17

Runtime: 100 minutes

Distributor: Seven Arts

Director: Jay Dubin

Executive Producer:

Producer: Fred Silverstein

Writer: Andrew Dice Clay & Lenny Shulman

Address Comments To:

RECOMMENDED ACTION: If you would like to stop NC-17 films, please call or write for our NC-17 material which will help you to clean up your local theaters and video stores. A $15 donation is recommended. Call or write:
Christian Film and Television Commission
P.O. Box 190010
Atlanta, GA 31119
(404) 237-0326

Also, please call or write United Artists Theaters to complain about their decision to carry NC-17 films:
Mr. Stewart Blair
Chairman
United Artist Entertainment
2930 East Third Avenue
Denver, Colorado 80206
(303) 321-4242

Also, please call or write Mr. Edwards to thank him for not carrying DICE RULES:
James Edwards, Sr.
EDWARDS THEATRES CIRCUIT, INC.
300 Newport Center Drive
Newport Beach, CA 92660
(714) 640-4600

Content:

(LLL, V) 213 obscenities & profanities, and violence

Summary:

Comedian Andrew Dice Clay gets down and dirty in this concert-comedy of his sell-out performance at Madison Square Garden. Rated NC-17, this filthy display of blistering obscenity may be one of foulest films ever made.

Review:

Those familiar with the outrageous antics and stage persona of comedian Andrew Dice Clay won't be surprised by this film which insults the sensibilities and good taste of most Americans.

However, a little background may be needed for those unacquainted with Dice's abusive, verbally pornographic style of comedy. A self-proclaimed "Brooklyn Bad Boy," Dice talks like a foul-mouthed biker from the sixties.

Presented in two parts, the first part of DICE RULES contains short skits narrated by Dice and his friend, Noodles. We watch young Dice, a geeky rube in overalls with a high-pitched voice, being victimized by everyone he meets. His life changes, however, when he buys a leather jacket. Miraculously, he becomes ultra-cool "Diceman." Sound stupid? It gets worse.

The second half of this film features Dice's 1990 sell-out concert at Madison Square Garden to a crowd of 20,000 people. Wearing his trademark jeweled jacket, black jeans and cowboy boots, Dice launches his assault.

Between cigarettes, Dice ridicules everyone from stutterers to the Japanese; from old people to the audience in front of him. His favorite target, however, is women. Dice refers to females as "pigs," in particular, criticizing their shape and size. Dice also castigates women with whom he has made love, including the "buck-toothed, hunch-backed" ones, calling these experiences "a displeasure."

Dice also spotlights his infamous dirty Mother Goose rhymes, the trademark schtick that made him famous. He even sings a song or two, in an Elvis style. Most of the time, however, he just talks dirty.

The overwhelming filth and obscenity in this film may sidetrack audiences from realizing that Dice isn't very funny at all. At Dice's L.A. premiere, half the audience left the show to watch two fans who burst into a fist fight during the show and were ordered outside.

DICE RULES' moral repugnance will no doubt sound its death knell at the box office, just as Dice's first movie, THE ADVENTURES OF FORD FAIRLANE, did. Pray that it flops hard enough to hammer another nail into the coffin of NC-17, a rating which already has one foot in the grave, thanks to its first disastrous test flight of HENRY AND JUNE. In Hollywood, box office money talks. Hopefully, this time they'll take the hint.

DICE RULES, in its utter despicableness, bears out St. Paul's admonition to the Ephesians: "It is a shame even to speak of those things which are done of them in secret" (Ephesians 5:12). Only in this case, the foul actions occur in plain view, making them not only repugnant, but in extremely bad taste.

EDITOR'S NOTE: The Motion Picture Association of America has admitted that the new NC-17 rating is equivalent to the old X-rating.

Last Fall, United Artists Theaters set up barriers to prevent their theaters from exhibiting NC-17 films. Unfortunately, political pressures caused them to carry DICE RULES.

In Atlanta, no screenings were held for exhibitors, which is against the law. Another exhibitor could sue United Artist Theaters.

James Edwards, Sr., chairman of Edwards Cinema, said that he will not show DICE RULES.

In Brief: