DOUBLE TAKE Add To My Top 10

Two Stereotypes for the Price of One

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: January 12, 2001

Starring: Orlando Jones, Eddie Griffin, Edward Herrmann, Gary Grubbs, Andrea Navedo, Garcelle Beauvais, Shawn Elliott, & Willow the Dog

Genre: Comedy/Police Thriller

Audience: Teenagers & adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 86 minutes

Address Comments To:

Michael Eisner, Chairman/CEO
The Walt Disney Company
(Buena Vista, Caravan, Hollywood, Miramax, & Touchstone Pictures)
Peter Schneider, Chairman
Walt Disney Studios
500 South Buena Vista Street
Burbank, CA 91521
(818) 560-1000

Content:

(RoRo, Ab, LLL, VVV, S, N, A, DD, MM) Romantic worldview that suggests society to blame for social “problems” & evil, plus man says he’s a Christian but line is meant for a joke; 89 obscenities & 8 profanities plus use of the “N” word during the fast dialogue; strong action violence including multiple scenes with gunfire (not graphic, but resulting in deaths & woundings), fistfights, dog bites people, man throws other man off train, & some slapstick humor such as man hits railroad signal; no sex scenes, but some sexual innuendoes & some sexual harrassment from women; women shown in revealing underwear during modeling show & female cleavage; alcohol use in several scenes; smoking & story revolves around drug dealers; and, some anti-police sentiments though story eventually backs away from being really anti-police, deceit, fraud, anti-Hispanic stereotyping & humor, & man framed.

Summary:

In DOUBLE TAKE, Orlando Jones plays a successful African-American investment banker framed for murder and on the lam from the police, with only a petty thief, played by black TV comic Eddie Griffin, to help him. DOUBLE TAKE suggests that society is to blame for social “problems” and evil and contains plenty of PG-13 foul language and strong, but generally bloodless, action violence.

Review:

The movie DOUBLE TAKE is sort of a poor man’s TRADING PLACES. With a weak, nearly impenetrable plot, the movie is mainly a vehicle for the passable comedic talents of its two stars, Eddie Griffin and Orlando Jones. The dialogue and acting are often breathtakingly bad. The script, however, does contain a number of funny lines and scenes, although they are often riddled with profanity (including liberal doses of the “N” word).

From what can be determined from the plot, Orlando Jones plays Daryl Chase, a Harvard graduate and financier who inadvertently gets caught up in a fraudulent monetary scheme (a more specific description is impossible because none of this ever becomes clear). Eventually, he gets framed for the murder of two policemen and goes on the lam. Pursued by various officials who claim to be from a range of law-enforcement agencies — from the FBI to the CIA — he eventually wends his way to Mexico. All the while he is shadowed by a man named “Freddie Tiffany” (Eddie Griffin), who claims at various junctures to be an FBI agent, a common street hustler and everything in between.

Throughout this movie, neither Daryl nor the audience (not that viewers will care) can distinguish the good guys from the bad guys. Based on gut instinct, however, Daryl elects to trust Freddie Tiffany and lets him accompany him on his run from the law. During the story, Freddie and Daryl often exchange identities and exaggeratedly assume each other’s mannerisms and dialect in several funny scenes.

The basic comic idea behind DOUBLE TAKE is the juxtaposition of these two characters: a Harvard-educated businessman who has “forgotten” his black “roots,” and a small-time hustler from the ‘hood who may have joined the police or may be playing some sort of other game, for good or bad intentions. Although riddled with racial stereotyping, this premise affords some pretty hilarious dialogue with a number of clever, creative lines. Regrettably, witty dialogue cannot save this movie from its convoluted, tedious plot, which features a good deal of gun violence. It’s worth noting that most of the murders are pretty bloodless by Hollywood standards, and the film utterly eschews sex and nudity, beyond a lot of conversational sexual innuendo. DOUBLE TAKE also harbors an endearing kindness toward animals.

Still, this is not a movie any child should see, if only based on the foul language alone, and many adults will find it offensive as well. Ultimately, many viewers, if not most, will think DOUBLE TAKE is too trifling to waste their time on at the theater. It’s an overlong sitcom without the restraints placed by TV censors.

In Brief:

In DOUBLE TAKE, Orlando Jones plays a successful African-American investment banker framed for murder and on the lam from the police, with only a petty thief, played by black TV comic Eddie Griffin, to help him. The comic idea behind DOUBLE TAKE is the juxtaposition of these two characters: a Harvard-educated businessman who has “forgotten” his black “roots,” and a small-time hustler from the ‘hood who may have joined the police or may be playing some sort of other game. Although riddled with racial stereotyping, this premise affords some pretty hilarious dialogue with a number of clever, creative lines.

Regrettably, witty dialogue cannot save DOUBLE TAKE from its convoluted, tedious plot, which features a good deal of violence. Most of the violence is pretty bloodless by Hollywood standards, and the film mostly eschews sex and nudity, beyond a fair amount of conversational sexual innuendo. Still, this is not a movie any child should see, based on the foul language alone. It will offend many adults as well. Ultimately, viewers will think DOUBLE TAKE is too trifling to waste their time on at the theater. It’s an overlong sitcom without the usual restraints from TV censors.