EASY A Add To My Top 10

Abhorrent Mockery of Christians

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: September 17, 2010

Starring: Emma Stone, Penn Badgely, Amanda Bynes, Stanley Tucci, Pamela Clarkson, Lisa Kudrow, Thomas Haden Church

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 90 minutes

Distributor: Screen Gems/Sony Pictures Entertainment

Director: Will Gluck

Executive Producer: None

Producer: Will Gluck, Zanne Devine

Writer: Bert V. Royal

Address Comments To:

Michael Lynton, Chairman/CEO
Amy Pascal, Chairman - Motion Picture Group
Sony Pictures Entertainment (Columbia Pictures/TriStar/Screen Gems/Provident/Triumph Films)
10202 West Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232-3195
Phone: (310) 244-4000; Fax: (310) 244-2626
Web Page: www.spe.sony.com/

Content:

(RoRo, PCPCPC, AbAbAb, HoHo, BB, C, LLL, V, SS, N, AA, DD, MM) Strong Romantic worldview with very strong politically correct, clichéd Anti-Christian content where a group of relatively conservative Christian students in high school is shown as hypocritical and self-righteous throughout, with one male member even revealed to have contracted chlamydia (a sexual disease) from his affair with the married school guidance counselor, and a pastor is shown to be the father of the main hypocritical Christian girl and later is seen hoping to hear some lascivious details when the heroine takes to the Internet to tell the truth at the movie’s climax, plus politically correct attitude toward overtly homosexual student who pretends to be heterosexual at one point, but the negative dominant worldview is diminished by positive portrayal of one mother and father who have been married for a long time and when heroine realizes some of the moral mistakes she’s made, when heroine often laments that simple sex has replaced traditional courtship and chivalry in today’s society, and when heroine wants to find answers through God, but when she goes to get counseling from a Catholic priest in a confessional and a Protestant pastor at another church she finds the confessional is empty and becomes frustrated that she’s opened her heart to no person and wonders if God heard her; at least 49 obscenities and several GD profanities; very brief violence when girl slaps another girl; strong sexual content and immorality (mostly in comic situations and sometimes rebuked) include fake sounds of sex created so people will think bullied homosexual boy is “straight,” implied pederasty/adultery reference when Christian teenage boy is revealed to have gotten a sexual disease from adult, married guidance counselor, female protagonist pretends to be a slut because she’s tired of being mocked for being a “nice” girl but she realizes she’s totally ruined her reputation and tries to correct her mistake(s), protagonist doesn’t understand some of the sexual language she hears from her peers, mother shares inappropriate stories of her premarital sexual past with teenage daughter, pastor is interested in lascivious details in confession, guidance counselor offers heroine condoms to use when she hears the false rumors of her rampant promiscuity, brief scene shows homosexual teenager has run away and happily moved into a relationship with a black homosexual man, and heroine indicates it sort of doesn’t matter whether she engages in sex with her boyfriend or waits until they get married; upper male nudity, girl in shower but only bare shoulders shown and it is implied that two hippie parents are sitting naked in front of two teenagers at a barbecue; strong alcohol abuse in brief scene of teens in a crowded house having an alcohol party; no tobacco use but student’s hippie parents pass marijuana bong in front of teens; and, strong miscellaneous immorality such as rampant lying and gossip but eventually rebuked, heroine accepts expensive gifts to lie about other people’s sexual exploits but this is eventually rebuked, and permissive parenting.

Summary:

EASY A is a raunchy teen comedy about a high school girl, Olive, who decides to build a slutty reputation to stop her peers from mocking her. Despite some funny, heartwarming, positive moments, EASY A has too much offensive content, including politically correct, clichéd, self-righteous mockery of Christians.

Review:

EASY A is a teen comedy in the mold of classic 1980s films by the late John Hughes, but its abhorrent content seems to reflect the often raunchy but sometimes heartwarming content in John’s movie SIXTEEN CANDLES. And, it contains a bigoted, very strong politically correct view of Christian high school students, who are mostly viewed as self-righteous “hypocrites.”

Olive is a small-town California high school student who’s depicted as sexually innocent. She even says she doesn’t understand some of the sexual slang her peers use. However, when she’s tired of being mocked for one-too-many boring weekends at home, she concocts a story of a one-night-stand with a college student to get her best friend off her back. The problem is, the school’s most blatantly Christian girl has overheard the two talking from inside a bathroom stall, and soon the entire school is buzzing about Olive’s wild new reputation.

Olive wants to tell the truth immediately, but a homosexual male friend asks her to help spare him from daily bullying. She mistakenly believes that, by helping him through even more lies, will be doing a greater good by easing his life. Soon, many other male students are asking her to concoct stories about their exploits with her, and she allows her reputation seem wilder and wilder, trading false stories of sexual favors for expensive gift certificates to stores.

Eventually, however, Olive realizes she’s completely destroyed her own reputation. She very clearly shows the pain of that huge mistake, before using one last elaborate ruse, and winds up telling the truth about everything and making things right. At the end, she is shown with the boy of her dreams, a good-natured and loyal young man who helped her escape her bad reputation.

Sadly, while it’s clear that the filmmakers want them to live happily ever after, the closing speech by Olive once again confuses things. Thought she confesses, she says that, whether she has sexual relations with her boyfriend in five minutes or years from now on their wedding night, it’s no one’s “GD” business.

EASY A is a cleverly written film with appealing characters. Though it shows that the modern-day preoccupation with sex has a detrimental effect on teenagers and their self-esteem, it has many obscenities, some offensive profanities, strong sexual content, drug references, underage drinking, and, one of the worst things of all, a very strong politically correct, negative attitude toward Christians who follow Jesus. For example, the Christians in the heroine’s school are shown as gossiping hypocrites. In fact, one Christian teenage boy is revealed to have gotten a sexual disease from an adult, married guidance counselor. This offensive content becomes a jarring, over-the-top running joke.

Despite this mockery of Christians, EASY A does show the devastating consequences of the heroine’s lies. At the last minute, however, the movie takes the stance that people wouldn’t resort to lies at all if people would just let others sleep with or not sleep with whomever they wanted, without gossiping in the first place.

Lead actress Emma Stone delivers a multi-layered performance in EASY A that bodes well for her future as a star. The movie is also filled with some laughs and occasionally touching moments.

That said, there’s too much abhorrent content in EASY A. Also, there’s just no excuse whatsoever for the movie’s vicious mockery of Christians. As Psalm 1:1 tells us, “Blessed is the person who does not walk in the counsel of the wicked, or stand in the way of sinners, or sit in the seat of mockers.”

In Brief:

EASY A is a raunchy teen comedy about a high school girl, Olive, who decides to build a slutty reputation to stop her peers from mocking her. She also wants to get her best friend from making snarky comments about her innocence. Then, Olive starts accepting expensive gifts from teenage boys asking her to concoct stories about their own exploits with her. Eventually, Olive realizes she’s completely destroyed her own reputation. So, she tries to fix her mistakes.

EASY A is a cleverly written film with some appealing characters and performances, some funny moments, and even some heartwarming moments. However, there’s too much offensive content. In fact, some of it is rather abhorrent. For example, there are more than 50 PG-13 obscenities and profanities and strong lewd content, including innuendoes about adult activity with teenagers. EASY A also has some drug references, implied nudity and underage drinking. Even worse, the movie contains politically correct, clichéd, self-righteous mockery of Christians, including Christian clergy. There’s absolutely no excuse for such abhorrent content. Please go to movieguide.org on the World Wide Web for more wholesome, uplifting comedies for you and your family.

HEADLINE: ** Abhorrent Mockery of Christians **

Title: EASY A

Quality: * * * Acceptability: -4

SUBTITLES: None

WARNING CODES:

Language: LLL

Violence: V

Sex: SS

Nudity: N

RATING: PG-13

RELEASE: September 17, 2010

TIME: 90 minutes

STARRING: Emma Stone, Penn Badgely, Amanda Bynes, Stanley Tucci, Pamela Clarkson, Lisa Kudrow, Thomas Haden Church

DIRECTOR: Will Gluck

PRODUCERS: Will Gluck, Zanne Devine

EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS: None

WRITER: Bert V. Royal

BASED ON THE NOVEL/PLAY BY: N/A

DISTRIBUTOR: Screen Gems/Sony Pictures Entertainment

CONTENT: (RoRo, PCPCPC, AbAbAb, HoHo, BB, C, LLL, V, SS, N, AA, DD, MM) Strong Romantic worldview with very strong politically correct, clichéd Anti-Christian content where a group of relatively conservative Christian students in high school is shown as hypocritical and self-righteous throughout, with one male member even revealed to have contracted chlamydia (a sexual disease) from his affair with the married school guidance counselor, and a pastor is shown to be the father of the main hypocritical Christian girl and later is seen hoping to hear some lascivious details when the heroine takes to the Internet to tell the truth at the movie’s climax, plus politically correct attitude toward overtly homosexual student who pretends to be heterosexual at one point, but the negative dominant worldview is diminished by positive portrayal of one mother and father who have been married for a long time and when heroine realizes some of the moral mistakes she’s made, when heroine often laments that simple sex has replaced traditional courtship and chivalry in today’s society, and when heroine wants to find answers through God, but when she goes to get counseling from a Catholic priest in a confessional and a Protestant pastor at another church she finds the confessional is empty and becomes frustrated that she’s opened her heart to no person and wonders if God heard her; at least 49 obscenities and several GD profanities; very brief violence when girl slaps another girl; strong sexual content and immorality (mostly in comic situations and sometimes rebuked) include fake sounds of sex created so people will think bullied homosexual boy is “straight,” implied pederasty/adultery reference when Christian teenage boy is revealed to have gotten a sexual disease from adult, married guidance counselor, female protagonist pretends to be a slut because she’s tired of being mocked for being a “nice” girl but she realizes she’s totally ruined her reputation and tries to correct her mistake(s), protagonist doesn’t understand some of the sexual language she hears from her peers, mother shares inappropriate stories of her premarital sexual past with teenage daughter, pastor is interested in lascivious details in confession, guidance counselor offers heroine condoms to use when she hears the false rumors of her rampant promiscuity, brief scene shows homosexual teenager has run away and happily moved into a relationship with a black homosexual man, and heroine indicates it sort of doesn’t matter whether she engages in sex with her boyfriend or waits until they get married; upper male nudity, girl in shower but only bare shoulders shown and it is implied that two hippie parents are sitting naked in front of two teenagers at a barbecue; strong alcohol abuse in brief scene of teens in a crowded house having an alcohol party; no tobacco use but student’s hippie parents pass marijuana bong in front of teens; and, strong miscellaneous immorality such as rampant lying and gossip but eventually rebuked, heroine accepts expensive gifts to lie about other people’s sexual exploits but this is eventually rebuked, and permissive parenting.

GENRE: Comedy

INTENDED AUDIENCE: Teenagers and adults

REVIEWER: Carl Kozlowski with Tom Snyder

REVIEW: EASY A is a teen comedy in the mold of classic 1980s films by the late John Hughes, but its abhorrent content seems to reflect the often raunchy but sometimes heartwarming content in John’s movie SIXTEEN CANDLES. And, it contains a bigoted, very strong politically correct view of Christian high school students, who are mostly viewed as self-righteous “hypocrites.”

Olive is a small-town California high school student who’s depicted as sexually innocent. She even says she doesn’t understand some of the sexual slang her peers use. However, when she’s tired of being mocked for one-too-many boring weekends at home, she concocts a story of a one-night-stand with a college student to get her best friend off her back. The problem is, the school’s most blatantly Christian girl has overheard the two talking from inside a bathroom stall, and soon the entire school is buzzing about Olive’s wild new reputation.

Olive wants to tell the truth immediately, but a homosexual male friend asks her to help spare him from daily bullying. She mistakenly believes that, by helping him through even more lies, will be doing a greater good by easing his life. Soon, many other male students are asking her to concoct stories about their exploits with her, and she allows her reputation seem wilder and wilder, trading false stories of sexual favors for expensive gift certificates to stores.

Eventually, however, Olive realizes she’s completely destroyed her own reputation. She very clearly shows the pain of that huge mistake, before using one last elaborate ruse, and winds up telling the truth about everything and making things right. At the end, she is shown with the boy of her dreams, a good-natured and loyal young man who helped her escape her bad reputation.

Sadly, while it’s clear that the filmmakers want them to live happily ever after, the closing speech by Olive once again confuses things. Thought she confesses, she says that, whether she has sexual relations with her boyfriend in five minutes or years from now on their wedding night, it’s no one’s “GD” business.

EASY A is a cleverly written film with appealing characters. Though it shows that the modern-day preoccupation with sex has a detrimental effect on teenagers and their self-esteem, it has many obscenities, some offensive profanities, strong sexual content, drug references, underage drinking, and, one of the worst things of all, a very strong politically correct, negative attitude toward Christians who follow Jesus. For example, the Christians in the heroine’s school are shown as gossiping hypocrites. In fact, one Christian teenage boy is revealed to have gotten a sexual disease from an adult, married guidance counselor. This offensive content becomes a jarring, over-the-top running joke.

Despite this mockery of Christians, EASY A does show the devastating consequences of the heroine’s lies. At the last minute, however, the movie takes the stance that people wouldn’t resort to lies at all if people would just let others sleep with or not sleep with whomever they wanted, without gossiping in the first place.

Lead actress Emma Stone delivers a multi-layered performance in EASY A that bodes well for her future as a star. The movie is also filled with some laughs and occasionally touching moments.

That said, there’s too much abhorrent content in EASY A. Also, there’s just no excuse whatsoever for the movie’s vicious mockery of Christians. As Psalm 1:1 tells us, “Blessed is the person who does not walk in the counsel of the wicked, or stand in the way of sinners, or sit in the seat of mockers.”

Please address your comments to:

Michael Lynton, Chairman/CEO

Amy Pascal, Chairman - Motion Picture Group

Sony Pictures Entertainment (Columbia Pictures/TriStar/Screen Gems/Provident/Triumph Films)

10202 West Washington Blvd.

Culver City, CA 90232-3195

Phone: (310) 244-4000; Fax: (310) 244-2626

Web Page: www.spe.sony.com/

SUMMARY: EASY A is a raunchy teen comedy about a high school girl, Olive, who decides to build a slutty reputation to stop her peers from mocking her. Despite some funny, heartwarming, positive moments, EASY A has too much offensive content, including politically correct, clichéd, self-righteous mockery of Christians.

IN BRIEF:

EASY A is a raunchy teen comedy about a high school girl, Olive, who decides to build a slutty reputation to stop her peers from mocking her. She also wants to get her best friend from making snarky comments about her innocence. Then, Olive starts accepting expensive gifts from teenage boys asking her to concoct stories about their own exploits with her. Eventually, Olive realizes she’s completely destroyed her own reputation. So, she tries to fix her mistakes.

EASY A is a cleverly written film with some appealing characters and performances, some funny moments, and even some heartwarming moments. However, there’s too much offensive content. In fact, some of it is rather abhorrent. For example, there are more than 50 PG-13 obscenities and profanities and strong lewd content, including innuendoes about adult activity with teenagers. EASY A also has some drug references, implied nudity and underage drinking. Even worse, the movie contains politically correct, clichéd, self-righteous mockery of Christians, including Christian clergy. There’s absolutely no excuse for such abhorrent content. Please go to movieguide.org on the World Wide Web for more wholesome, uplifting comedies for you and your family.