EIGHT CRAZY NIGHTS Add To My Top 10

Hollow Holiday Tale

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: November 27, 2002

Starring: Adam Sandler, Jackie Titone and Austin Stout

Genre: Animation/Comedy

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 70 minutes

Address Comments To:

Amy Pascal, Chairman
Columbia Pictures
John Calley, Chairman/CEO
Sony Pictures Entertainment
10202 West Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232-3195
Phone: (310) 244-4000
Fax: (310) 244-2626
Web Page: www.spe.sony.com/

Content:

(PaPa, AbAb, Ro, C, B, HoHo, LLL, V, S, AA, D, MM) Pagan worldview with Christmas and Hanukkah portrayed as solely cultural celebrations to be mocked and most decisions made from momentary emotion with some Christmas symbols shown such as manger and cross, and Jewish symbols portrayed such as Menorah, but true meaning never explored as well as some moral behavior portrayed such as an older man befriending and patiently mentoring a younger; homosexual references; excessive language, especially for a cartoon, with 30 obscenities, and much scatological humor; cartoon violence with old man being pushed down a hill in an outhouse; many sexual and homosexual “humorous” references including woman with 3 breasts, man married to woman who was once a man, men handcuffed together in homosexual position, several references to and portrayals of things from Spencer gifts and Victoria’s Secret, and children kiss each other on playground; protagonist shown to be an alcoholic whose drinking is ruining his life; smoking; and, horrendous display of disrespectfulness to authority and elderly, dark tone of suicide with lyrics saying, “I can’t believe I haven’t killed myself.”


Summary:

In the animated EIGHT CRAZY NIGHTS, Adam Sandler is Davey Stone, a hopeless single Jewish guy taken in by an old man who tries to prevent him from wrecking everyone’s holidays. With foul language and scatological humor, a dark outlook and sexual innuendo, this alluring animated movie is completely inappropriate for children and teenagers.


Review:

EIGHT CRAZY NIGHTS is the animated story of Davey Stone (Adam Sandler), who is appropriately named in that he stays stoned on alcohol during the holiday season. A 33-year-old Jewish boy, Davey began drinking after his parents were killed on the night of a big basketball game. Once the star player, Davey now mopes about with a horrible reputation as a no-good slacker. When he’s caught making mischief and wrecking everyone’s holidays, he’s brought before the town’s judge and ordered to go to jail.
A short, old man, “Whitey,” (also Adam Sandler) comes forward and begs the judge to give Davey another chance. He suggests that Davey come alongside him and help coach youngsters in basketball.
The reluctant and unthankful Davey complies, but makes a mess of everything and insults everyone in sight – from the elderly to the obese. His foul language, drinking and sour outlook continue to make him the bane of the town’s existence. When Davey finds out that Whitey’s goal is to win the town’s citizenship pin, he laughs at Whitey and insults him, reminding him that no one even knows he exists.
Whitey continues to befriend the hurtful Davey, however, and even invites him to live with him and his sister, Eleanore (also Adam Sandler), when his trailer burns down. Will their kindness and patience prevail and change the stonyhearted Stone, or is it too late?
EIGHT CRAZY NIGHTS is a well-advertised holiday movie with bright, alluring posters that draw children to this cartoon. It is not appropriate for children or teenagers, however. It does have plenty of scatological comedy and body humor, which, regrettably, many children love. It also has plenty of adult content, including sexual innuendos and homosexual references. The tone is dark and hollow and even suicidal at times. The true meaning of Christmas and Hanukkah are never explored. It all seems like a ridiculous cultural exercise.
As with many other movies over the past two years, EIGHT CRAZY NIGHTS portrays the issue of the absent father and a stab is made at showing the need for healing. As presented here, however, it’s awkward and incomplete. The Whitey character has the patience of Job with the disrespectful and destructive Davey. He makes a solid attempt to be somewhat of a surrogate father to the younger man, but Davey’s mean-spirited attitude during the majority of the story far overshadows the warm fuzzies of relational healing at the end.
The coarse humor in this movie is reminiscent of SOUTH PARK, and the attempt to portray symbols and stereotypes of Christmas and Hanukkah falls way short. The movie tries to show its inclusiveness by showing an ice Santa next to an ice Menorah, but it doesn’t quite work. Again, neither religion is portrayed well. There are several songs in the movie, but they contain foul language and adult themes as well. Moral audiences will likely choose to redirect their holiday box office dollars to such worthy pictures as JONAH and TREASURE ISLAND.


In Brief:

EIGHT CRAZY NIGHTS is the animated story of Davey Stone (Adam Sandler), a lonely, alcoholic 33-year-old Jewish boy who’s caught making mischief and wrecking everyone’s holidays. He’s brought before the town’s judge and ordered to go to jail, but a short, old man, “Whitey,” (also Adam Sandler) begs the judge to give Davey another chance. The reluctant and unthankful Davey complies, but makes a mess of everything and insults everyone in sight – from the elderly to the obese. His foul language, drinking and sour outlook continue to make him the bane of the town’s existence. Whitey continues to befriend the hurtful Davey, however, and even invites him to live with him and his sister. Will his kindness and patience prevail and change the stonyhearted Stone, or is it too late?



EIGHT CRAZY NIGHTS is a well-advertised holiday movie with bright, alluring posters that draw children to this cartoon, but it is not appropriate for children or teens. It has plenty of scatological body humor and adult content, including sexual innuendos and homosexual references. The tone is dark and hollow and even suicidal at times, with the true meaning of Christmas and Hanukkah never explored