EVERY LITTLE STEP Add To My Top 10

The Making of A CHORUS LINE

Content -2
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 17, 2009

Starring: (as themselves) Bob Avian, Michael Bennett (archive footage), Charlotte d’Amroise, Natascia Diaz, Ramon Flowers, Marvin Hamlisch, and Donna McKechnie

Genre: Documentary

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 96 minutes

Address Comments To:

Michael Barker, Tom Bernard and Marcia Bloom
Co-Presidents
Sony Pictures Classics
(Sony Pictures Entertainment)
550 Madison Avenue, 8th Floor
New York, NY 10022
Phone: (212) 833-8833
Fax: (212) 833-8844
Web Page: www.sonyclassics.com
Email: [email protected]

Content:

(PaPa, HoHoHo, LLL, D, M) Strong pagan worldview as characters live only for their dream of dancing along with very strong homosexual references and characters; 20 profanities and at least 17 obscenities, often as part of song lyrics; no violence; no scenes of sexuality; no nudity but men and women in tights, bare midriffs and other dance attire; no alcohol; smoking; and, nothing else objectionable.

Summary:

EVERY LITTLE STEP follows the year long audition process of the revival of the Broadway hit A CHORUS LINE as well as the genesis of the original production through archival footage. There are many homosexual references but fans of Broadway may find it interesting. For the most part, however, this documentary falls flat.

Review:

EVERY LITTLE STEP follows the year long audition process of the revival of the Broadway hit A CHORUS LINE as well as the genesis of the original production through archival footage.

In 1975, A CHORUS LINE hit Broadway winning numerous Tony Awards and being the longest running Broadway show at the time. In 2006, one of the original producers launched a revival with one of the original cast members as choreographer. Cameras follow the grueling audition process for the revival as the actual stage show in 1975 is discussed and seen through archival footage. The stage show itself is about a group of dancers auditioning for their role. The real world dancers are seen going through the process, wanting the job of a lifetime.

For anyone familiar with the musical, this documentary is a nostalgic remembrance of such songs as “At the Ballet” or “What I Did for Love.” Archival footage of the late Michael Bennett highlights the unique way that they conceived of the show, tape recording real life stories from the lives of Broadway dancers.

At some level, the movie seems much like a feature version of AMERICAN IDOL. The camera watches dancers in suspense as to whether they made the cut. The camera then follows the dancers calling their loved ones to tell them the good or bad news.

There is some emotion, but for the most part the viewers remain distanced from the story. Since the audience is not emotionally involved with the auditioning dancers, the outcome is not important, and the movie begins to drag.

There are positive messages of people working hard and showing perseverance to achieve their goals.

Many of the onscreen male characters, including Michael Bennett, discuss their homosexual lives and their struggle to “come out.” This is mirrored in many of the dance numbers that are shown in detail as a character describes how he wanted to be a girl when he was younger.

The documentary has foul language, mostly in the lyrics. There is also one song that uses graphic jargon to discuss the joys of plastic surgery, and how once a dancer has implants, she gets more roles.

Fans of Broadway may want to watch this for the history of A CHORUS LINE and behind the scenes of how it all began. However, much discernment is required.

In Brief:

EVERY LITTLE STEP follows the year long audition process of the revival of the Broadway hit A CHORUS LINE, as well as the genesis of the original production through archival footage. In 1975, A CHORUS LINE hit Broadway. In 2006, one of the original producers launched a revival with an original cast member as choreographer. Cameras follow the grueling audition process for the revival. Also, the actual 1975 stage show is discussed and seen through archival footage. The show itself is about a group of dancers auditioning for their role. The real world dancers are seen going through the process, wanting the job of a lifetime.

On one level, this documentary is like a dull feature version of AMERICAN IDOL. The camera watches dancers wondering in suspense whether they made the cut. It then follows the dancers calling their loved ones to tell them the good or bad news. Many onscreen male characters discuss their homosexual lives and their struggle to “come out.” This is mirrored in many of the dance numbers that are shown in detail while a character describes how he wanted to be a girl when he was younger.