EYE OF THE STORM Add To My Top 10

Content +4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: January 01, 1970

Starring: Connie Sellecca, Jeff Conaway, Deborah Tucker, Cyndi James Gossett, Ken Magee, & Sasha Jenson

Genre: Evangelistic Drama

Audience: Teens & adults

Rating: Not submitted to MPAA

Runtime: 90 minutes

Distributor: World Wide Pictures

Director: Robert Marcarelli

Executive Producer:

Producer: Eric Gilliland & John Shepherd

Writer: John Shepherd & Rocky Lane

Address Comments To:

Content:

(B, C) Positive portrayal of personal acceptance of Christ


Summary:

EYE OF THE STORM from World Wide Pictures (the film division of the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association), comes after a five-year hiatus in their film production. Set in the Persian Gulf during Operation Desert Storm, news anchor, Tom Edwards, covers the war's Christian aspect. Thus, the filmmakers work the familiar evangelical formula into contemporary events and portray Edwards' conversion to Christ.


Review:

After a five-year hiatus, World Wide Pictures, the film division of the Billy Graham Association, is releasing EYE OF THE STORM about Tom Edwards, a successful news anchor, who has just returned from covering Operation Desert Storm. While in the Persian Gulf, Tom saved an attractive co-worker, Pete, from injury. Now, Tom comes up with a story: What happened to the battlefield converts to Christianity? Tom discovers one soldier after another who has become more convinced of the reality of Jesus's lordship in postwar living. Meanwhile, Tom's daughter, Jill, has become increasingly distant. When a crisis blows open, a review of Pete's Billy Graham video footage leads to a satisfying reconciliation of father and daughter with each other and God.
EYE OF THE STORM occasionally portrays the sinners as more interesting than the saints. However, Jeff Conaway pulls off the conversion scenes very convincingly. Overall, EYE OF THE STORM, though it is a limited audience movie, marks a welcome re-entry of World Wide Pictures into Christian filmmaking. Regrettably, unlike previous World Wide films, it was made for church release, as opposed to theatrical release.


In Brief: