FALLING FROM GRACE Add To My Top 10

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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 21, 1992

Starring: John Mellencamp, Mariel Hemingway, Claude Akins, Kay Lenz, & Dub Taylor.

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 106 minutes

Distributor: Columbia Pictures

Director: John Mellencamp

Executive Producer:

Producer: Larry McMurty

Writer: Harry Sandler

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Content:

(LLL, V, S, A/D) 17 obscenities & 10 profanities; fist fight; adultery & sexual immorality (negatively portrayed); and, guzzling alcohol & intoxication. As well as the cautionary messages: infidelity extracts a heavy toll, and money doesn't buy good relationships.

Summary:

FALLING FROM GRACE is a cautionary tale about squandered relationships and the emptiness of riches. Like a mournful country ballad with too many verses, the film meanders through a series of betrayals and confrontations within a dysfunctional family.

Review:

FALLING FROM GRACE meanders through a series of betrayals and confrontations within a dysfunctional family. It begins with Bud Parks (musician John Mellencamp), a highly successful country singer who returns home for a family reunion. Nearly all his relatives resent his wealth, want some of it, or are just plain evil. Bud's father, Speck, is a wealthy rancher with an insatiable desire for sex. He forces himself on his daughter-in-law B.J., who was Bud's high school sweetheart. In turn, B.J. seduces Bud. Bud's wife Alice, the only decent person, is aggravated about her husband's philandering and father-in-law's advances. She responds to Speck's harassment with a frying pan across the chops and demands that Bud shape up. He refuses, so she leaves for California with her daughter. Bud nearly self-destructs. The movie ends at the hospital with Bud receiving undeserved attention from Alice. Regrettably, there is no sign of repentance.

With so much pain and suffering on display, the film could have had a more redemptive conclusion. Instead, we are left with cautionary messages: infidelity extracts a heavy toll, and money doesn't buy good relationships.

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