FILLY BROWN

The Anti-L.A. Tourism Movie

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 19, 2013

Starring: Gina Rodriguez, Jenni Rivera,
Lou Diamond Phillips,
Khool-Aid Rios, Eddie Vargas

Genre: Drama

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 80 minutes

Distributor: Pantelion Films

Director: Youssef Delara, Michael D.
Olmos

Executive Producer: Edward James Olmos, Kevin
Smith, Homa Soroor

Producer: Amir Delara, Youssef Delara,
Michael D. Olmos, Mico Olmos,
Edward Rios, Khoolaid Rios,
Victor Teran

Writer: Youssef Delara

Address Comments To:

Paul Presburger, CEO
James N. McNamara, Chairman
Pantelion Films (A partnership between Lionsgate Entertainment and Grupo Televiso)
2700 Colorado Avenue, Suite 100
Santa Monica, CA 90404
Website: www.pantelionfilms.com; Email: info@pantelionfilms.com

Content:

(PaPaPa, C, B, LLL, VV, S, N, AA, DDD, MMM) Very strong pagan worldview of lifestyles heavily influenced by drugs and alcohol, some people try to make an honest living but are sucked into the horrible prevailing culture, plus some redemptive, moral elements of forgiveness and reform; at least 94 mostly strong obscenities and one profanity; an attempted rape leads to a man hitting a 17-year-old girl, which then results in a string of violent reprisals (all beatings, no gunfire), including gang uses baseball bat to assault man; no sex beyond the attempted rape; upper male nudity; some alcohol use including the provision of alcohol to a minor; several scenes of drug use, a scene with the payoff of a drug dealer, and a scene of a prison inmate clearly under the heavy influence of drugs; and, very strong miscellaneous immorality includes dishonesty, plagiarism, stealing, kidnapping, bitterness, and major child rebellion.

Summary:

FILLY BROWN is about life in a part of Los Angeles most people would not want to go near. The vulgar, drug infested, violent lifestyle should help keep people away from parts of Los Angeles and this movie.

Review:

FILLY BROWN is about life in a part of Los Angeles most people would not want to go near. The vulgar, drug infested, violent lifestyle should help keep people away from parts of Los Angeles and this movie.



Filly Brown, the heroine of the movie, is hardly heroic. She engages in crime, dishonesty and plagiarism in an effort to raise money to help get her mother out of prison. She then learns that the money was really to pay off her mother’s drug dealers. An effort is made to make Filly look like an idealist forced to become a sexy rap singer to raise money for her mother. Sadly, her idea of idealism is rap tunes expressing bitterness toward those who look down on and mistreat people like herself. Meanwhile, Filly’s father is presented as noble when he turns down an opportunity for considerable contracting work because the person offering the contract wanted a foreman who looked “respectable” (neatly dressed as opposed to covered in tattoos).



A record executive offers Filly a lucrative contract that could help solve her family’s economic problems. However, it comes at a price.



The irony is that a movie like FILLY BROWN would only make most people want to move further away from Los Angeles. Most people don’t want to live in a neighborhood where sentences are punctuated with “f” words, men search for rare places left to add a new tattoo, and drug dealers drive around ready to engage in urban warfare. FILLY BROWN will never be mistaken for an L.A. tourism promotion piece.



While the movie does end with themes of forgiveness and life change, it’s not driven by repentance in an overtly Christian sense. People can realize their life is a mess and try to change, but the most remarkable transformation is when someone seeks God’s forgiveness and a new life led by the Spirit of God. In Los Angeles, there are no doubt many true stories of life transformation through Jesus Christ. Had FILLY BROWN been such a story, it would have been a much better and more successful movie.



Jesus Christ is the one who offers true hope to communities like the one portrayed in FILLY BROWN. Jesus can clean up foul language, cure drug addictions and even turn drug dealers into kind, loving and honest neighbors. We need more movies offering this solution.

In Brief:

FILLY BROWN is about life in a vulgar, drug infested, violent part of Los Angeles. Filly Brown engages in crime, dishonesty and plagiarism in an effort to raise money to help get her mother out of prison. She then learns that the money is really needed to pay off her mother’s drug dealers. An effort is made to make Filly look like an idealist forced to become a sexy rap singer to raise money for her mother. Sadly, her idea of idealism is rap tunes expressing bitterness toward those who look down on and mistreat people like herself. Filly’s father turns down an opportunity for considerable contracting work because the person offering the contract wants a foreman who looks “respectable.” A record executive offers Filly a lucrative contract that could help solve her family’s economic problems. However, it comes at a price.



FILLY BROWN’s depiction of Los Angeles would make most people less interested in visiting that city. FILLY BROWN ends with themes of forgiveness and life change, but the worldview is mostly pagan, with more than 90 obscenities and profanities.