FLAWLESS Add To My Top 10

Not Quite

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: November 26, 1999

Starring: Robert DeNiro, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Daphne Rubin-Vega, Barry Miller, Luis Saguar, & Skipp Sudduth

Genre: Comedy Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 111 minutes

Distributor: MGM

Director: Joel Schumacher

Executive Producer: Neil Machlis

Producer: Joel Schumacher & Jane Rosenthal

Writer: Joel Schumacher

Address Comments To:

Frank Mancuso, Chairman & CEO


MGM/UA


2500 Broadway Street


Santa Monica, CA 90404-3061


(310) 449-3000

Content:

(PCPC, HoHo, LLL, VV, S, N, AA, DD, M) Politically correct worldview of alleged tolerance toward the lives of drag queen homosexuals; 239 obscenities (plus some muffled ones) & 22 profanities, plus many crude sexual references; moderate violence such as gangsters tear up apartments looking for stolen money, hitting, gunshots exchanged, fight on stairs, people hit with objects, shoving, & man shot dead; implied fornication & implied homosexual behavior; upper male nudity; alcohol use & drunkenness; smoking, crack cocaine use & man admits to dealing illegal drugs; and, gangsters terrorize people in apartment building, prostitution implied & envy.


Summary:

In FLAWLESS, Robert DeNiro plays a retired security guard suffereing from a stroke who gets singing lessons from a drag queen homosexual, played by Philip Seymour Hoffman. Full of almost nonstop foul language, this is a politically correct movie whose moral is that you can't judge a book by its cover.


Review:

A retired security guard gets more than he bargained in the new movie FLAWLESS starring Robert DeNiro and Philip Seymour Hoffman.
DeNiro plays Walt Koontz, a security guard who lives in rundown apartment in New York City. Walt has heated arguments with Rusty, a chubby drag queen who lives upstairs. Rusty, played by Hoffman, is often rehearsing with several of his homosexual buddies, who perform at a local nightclub. Walt is constantly yelling at them to shut up, and they yell back at him.
Late one night, while trying to help a neighbor whose boyfriend has stolen some money from the local gangster, Walt suffers a stroke. The stroke leaves him partially paralyzed. Refusing to leave his apartment for therapy, Walt gets some physical therapy at home. His doctor also advises him to take singing lessons in order to improve his speech. When he loses the card to the instructor she recommended, who lives cross town anyway, Walt asks Rusty to give him the lessons. Their volatile relationship takes a turn toward mutual respect. Meanwhile, the gangster continues to look for his money, which is now missing. A final confrontation leads to a new revelation for Walt and Rusty about what it takes to be a real man.
The politically correct conceit in FLAWLESS is that people should embrace homosexual behavior. This is belied, however, by the movie's own story, which shows that homosexuality is a bizarre masquerade of confused sexuality resulting from neurotic family relationships. Despite this, the movie tries hard to show that Rusty the drag queen has an inner strength and courage to match Walt the security guard's. This is the moral of the story, which, to put it in simpler terms, is the venerable adage, "You can't judge a book by its cover."
FLAWLESS is a small, well-made diversion, mostly because of the performances of the two lead actors. Regrettably, however, it not only has a pro-homosexual worldview, it also has lots of very strong foul language. The obscenities are almost nonstop, another fact which belies the movie's central conceit about its politically correct view of sexual tolerance. If this kind of tolerance is so valid, then what's with all the foul language and crude sexual references? Why would any intelligent person want to emulate such vulgarity?


In Brief:

In FLAWLESS, Robert DeNiro plays Walt Koontz, a security guard who lives in rundown apartment in New York City. Late one night, while trying to help a neighbor in trouble, Walt suffers a stroke which leaves him partially paralyzed. Refusing to leave his apartment for therapy, Walt reluctantly agrees to a rehabilitation program that includes singing lessons from a chubby drag queen homosexual named Rusty, played by Philip Seymour Hoffman, who lives upstairs.



The politically correct conceit in FLAWLESS is that people should embrace homosexual behavior. This is belied, however, by the movie's own story, which shows that homosexuality is a bizarre masquerade of confused sexuality resulting from neurotic family relationships. Despite this, the movie tries hard to show that Rusty the drag queen has an inner strength and courage to match Walt the security guard's. In addition to its pro-homosexual worldview, FLAWLESS includes a steady stream of very strong obscenities and profanities, and many crude sexual references. If Hollywood truly wants its view of sexual tolerance to be part of mainstream America, why does it continue to depict this kind of behavior? No amount of self-righteous indignation can sanitize such R-rated material