FLUKE

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: June 02, 1995

Starring: Matthew Modine, Nancy Travis & Eric Stoltz

Genre: Drama

Audience:

Rating: PG

Runtime: 92 minutes

Distributor: MGM

Director:

Executive Producer:

Producer:

Writer: Carlo Carlei & James Carrington

Address Comments To:

Content:

(FR, NA, L, V, S, A, D, M) Non-Christian worldview including reincarnation of two characters, accidental creation, animals viewed as equals to humans, & boy prays to deceased father for protection; one mild vulgarity & dog urinates on cars, people and sidewalks; dog bites two men, two car wrecks without explosions & dog breaks into a research laboratory; one scene where sex out of marriage is implied; alcohol use by one character; smoking; and, street lady gambles.

Summary:

By some FLUKE, Thomas Johnson (Matt Modine) is killed in a car crash and is reincarnated as a dog facing dog catchers, evil scientists and "incredible journeys" all in attempt to be reunited with his widowed wife and child. Frequent, blatant references to reincarnation overshadow any positive themes of self-sacrifice and family ties also found in the film.

Review:

It was a dark and stormy night. Thomas Johnson (Matthew Modine) and Jeff Newman (Eric Stoltz) each recklessly race their cars down a wet country road. By some FLUKE, an on-coming truck runs Matthew Modine off the road and the resulting crash kills him. Instantly, the deceased Johnson becomes reborn as a puppy, in a downtown Atlanta alley. He is caught by the pound, scheduled to be put to sleep, caught by a beauty supply research lab, used in testing and generally misunderstood by all of the "two- leggers" or humans. Luckily, he meets another canine named Rumbo who teaches him how to be a dog. Eventually, FLUKE begins to remember his life as a human, and decides to make an "incredible journey" to find his widowed wife and child.



FLUKE is well made. The acting is very believable and full of warm fuzzy and weepy-sad moments. Regrettably, reincarnation raises its ugly head again and again in this film. This false religion tries to demonstrate that love never dies. It actually ends up teaching the audience that people never die; they just pass on to "another life." Strangely, the progression of lives is downward from more advanced species to lesser ones i.e. humans, dogs and even...squirrels! This reincarnation endorsement overshadows any positive themes of self-sacrifice and family ties that are also depicted in FLUKE.

In Brief: