FROM PRADA TO NADA Add To My Top 10

Jane Austen with a Latino Spin

Content -1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: January 28, 2011

Starring: Camilla Belle, Alexa Vega, Wilmer Valderrama, Nicholas D’Agosto, Adriana Barraza, Kuno Becker

Genre: Comedy/Drama

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 107 minutes

Address Comments To:

@Jon Feltheimer, CEO
Lionsgate Films AKA Lions Gate Films
2700 Colorado Ave.
Santa Monica, CA 90404
Phone: (310) 449-9200; Fax: (310) 255-3870
Website: www.lionsgatefilms.com

Content:

(BB, C, Ro, Pa, LL, V, S, AA, DD, M) Strong moral worldview overall, with a positive view of family, sacrifice and some overt Christian prayers and symbols in a Catholic context, but mitigated by some Romantic worldview elements and pagan content; eight obscenities, one strong profanity and five light profanities; light threats of violence and a gun displayed when protagonists encounter female gang members; implied fornication, romance and kissing; scantily clad females; alcohol use and drunkenness; mention of marijuana and implied marijuana use; and, lying, illegitimate child, divorce, tattoos, and illegal immigrants hide from Immigration.

Summary:

In FROM PRADA TO NADA, two rich Latino sisters are forced to move from their fancy home in Beverly Hills into East Los Angeles to live with their estranged aunt, when their father dies and they find he was heavily in debt. FROM PRADA TO NADA is funny, with a positive depiction of faith and family, but it has a few risqué moments, plus some foul language and references to marijuana, so caution for older children is warranted.

Review:

FROM PRADA TO NADA is a modern day American version of Jane Austen’s classic novel SENSE AND SENSITIBILITY, set in the Latino community in Los Angeles.

The stage is set with two wealthy sisters as the main characters, Nora and Mary Dominguez. Nora is sensible, pure and studious, trying to become a lawyer. Her sister, Mary, spends her time shopping and getting boys. The girls live with their father in a grand mansion in Beverly Hills, where everything is handed to them. Completely unexpectedly, the father they love so much dies.

At their father’s funeral, the girls find out they have an illegitimate older brother, Gabriel Dominguez. Gabriel and his heartless wife, Olivia, decide to repossess the grand mansion after the girls find out their father was in great debt.

Nora thinks fast and decides the course of the sisters’ new lives: to move to East Los Angeles. Nora and Mary resettle with their aunt in an edgy part of town. Everything is different, the gritty streets, with harsh-looking women gangs, bars on the doors and windows, and scantily clothed hairstylists pulling at Nora and Mary’s hair. But, they soon find out the home provides loving relatives who take care of the girls and show them how to live on means so much different then they did when they had everything.

The sisters meet the wretched Olivia’s kind brother, Edward, who offers Nora a job at the law firm where he works. Nora decides to hold off on law school and work with Edward to help support Mary finishing school. As Nora is riding the bus every day to work, she meets some women that have legal issues and need her help. She decides to defend the women and fights for them for free against a big organization. From this Nora learns she has a heart of the people and opens a “Gratis” law firm out of her house. At the same time, Mary is falling for the charming Mexican teaching assistant. Mary lies to the TA, telling him she still lives in the heart of Beverly Hills, but when Mexican revolution day arrives, she tells him the truth. At the celebration, the girls dance and scream “Mexico!” with their large festive family.

[ SPOILER ALERTS] Meanwhile, Nora invites Edward and receives her first kiss that night. She pushes him away, however, because she only wants to focus on work and is scared to love. Mary, however, stays overnight with the charming TA.

Drama ensues when Nora eventually finds out Edward is getting engaged. Nora is crushed because she let him go, but Mary comforts her and convinces her to go to the engagement party and confess to Edward. At the party, Mary sees the charming TA and finds out he is married. She impulsively drives away, but the car stalls, then starts and she is traumatically hit on the passenger side.

Mary is taken to the hospital and the family prays over her, praying the rosary, then getting more serious praying and burning incense. Mary awakes and realizes that this “Nada” world is very loving, which is just what she is really wants.

FROM PRADA TO NADA is an entertaining comedy/drama. It emphasizes the role of families staying together and loving each other. Each person has to make sacrifices, but, in the end, the sacrifices are worth it. Also, prayer helps solve the plot problem at the end.

FROM PRADA TO NADA is funny, with a positive depiction of faith and family, but it has a few risqué moments, plus some foul language and references to marijuana, so caution for older children is warranted.

In Brief:

FROM PRADA TO NADA is a modern day American version of Jane Austen’s classic novel SENSE AND SENSITIBILITY, set in the Latino community in Los Angeles. When their rich father dies and their older half brother and his wife take the Beverly Hills estate, Nora and Mary Dominguez have to resettle with their estranged aunt in East Los Angeles. Nora is sensible, pure and studious, trying to become a lawyer. Her sister, Mary, has spent her time shopping and getting boys. Now, the two sisters must learn that to love and take care of each other is much greater than all the riches goods they had when their father was alive.

FROM PRADA TO NADA is an entertaining comedy/drama. It emphasizes the role of families staying together and loving each other. Each person has to make sacrifices, but, in the end, the sacrifices are worth it. Also, prayer helps solve the plot problem at the end. FROM PRADA TO NADA is funny, with a positive depiction of faith and family, but it has a few risqué moments, plus some foul language and references to marijuana, so caution for older children is warranted.