GHOST WORLD Add To My Top 10

Misfit and Miss Fit In

Content -3
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: July 20, 2001

Starring: Thora Birch, Scarlett Johansson, Brad Renfro, & Steve Buscemi

Genre: Comedy/Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 111 minutes

Address Comments To:

Alex Yemenidjian, CEO
MGM/UA
2500 Broadway Street
Santa Monica, CA 90404-3061
(310) 449-3000

Content:

(HH, PaPa, Fe, Ab, LLL, V, S, N, A, D, MM) Humanistic worldview with pagan elements about two teenagers adjusting to life after high school graduation, plus feminism, immoral behavior & anti-Jewish elements & other bigotry; 2 blasphemies, 20 profanities, 46 obscenities (with 23 uses of the “f-word”), plus obscene hand gestures; mild violence (though comically played) where a customer defends an attacker by choking him & violent drawings; kissing, implied fornication, masturbation referenced & encouraged, teenage girl visits adult bookstore; brief nudity depicted in drawings & artwork; alcohol use; smoking; and, cruel prank played on lonely man, brief expression of wanting to kill father & oblique reference to suicide as ultimate solution.

Summary:

GHOST WORLD charts the different courses taken by two girls after they graduate from high school. Though cleverly crafted, GHOST WORLD offers little hope and sends a terrible message: that suicide is justifiable and inevitable for those who cannot fit into real life.

Review:

Enid and Rebecca are two high school graduates thrust into real life in GHOST WORLD. Enid (Thora Birch of AMERICAN BEAUTY) is the outsider who desperately wants someone to understand and love her. Rebecca (THE HORSE WHISPERER) is her best friend growing distant because she can adjust to life’s responsibilities and demands much better than Enid. Right away, Rebecca is able to get a job and considers moving into an apartment while Enid struggles with a remedial art class and coping with an unhappy home.

The two bored teenagers decide to play a prank on a lonely, unattractive man named Seymour (Steve Buscemi) who desires a romantic relationship with a woman. Feeling sorry for the older man, Enid befriends Seymour and helps him get a date with an attractive woman. Eventually, Enid realizes she has feelings for Seymour and spends the night with him. This disrupts her life further (and Seymour’s) and accurately demonstrates that immorality is more tantalizing than satisfying.

Frustrated with her own lack of identity, Enid constantly changes hair styles and clothes in search of her true self. She alternately ridicules and sympathizes with “misfits, jerks and dorks” by explaining to Rebecca that, “those are our people.” It is sad to see Enid and Seymour acknowledge that they cannot relate to “99 percent of humanity,” yet they desperately long for love and trustworthiness in their lives.

While Rebecca’s life stabilizes, Enid’s spirals down toward self-destruction. Unsatisfied with the direction of her directionless life, Enid ultimately decides to “leave town.” In the movie, her actions (catching an unscheduled bus on a street without bus service) are merely a metaphor for her suicide.

GHOST WORLD is a poignant look at the harsh reality many people face after their structured school life ends. It reminds viewers of the pain of a godless life and shows a lost world in need of a Savior. GHOST WORLD is filled with misfit, lonely people and, sadly, there are no redemptive characters or options shown in the story. Ironically, the only references to God and Jesus are through the characters cursing. Though cleverly crafted, GHOST WORLD offers little hope (other than advising people to conform to the strains of career and existence) and sends a terrible message to society: that suicide is justifiable and inevitable for those who cannot fit into real life.

In Brief:

Enid and Rebecca are two high school graduates thrust into real life in GHOST WORLD. Enid (Thora Birch) is the outsider who desperately wants someone to understand and love her. Rebecca is her best friend growing distant because she can adjust to life’s responsibilities and demands much better than Enid. Eventually, Enid takes up with an older lonely man, then ultimately decides to “leave town.” Her actions (catching an unscheduled bus on a street without bus service) are merely a metaphor for her suicide.

GHOST WORLD is a poignant look at the harsh reality many people face after their structured school life ends. It reminds viewers of the pain of a godless life and shows a lost world in need of a Savior. GHOST WORLD is filled with misfit, lonely people and, sadly, there are no redemptive characters or options shown in the story. Ironically, the only references to God and Jesus are through cursing. Though cleverly crafted, GHOST WORLD offers little hope (other than advising people to conform to the strains of career and mere existence) and sends a terrible message: that suicide is justifiable and inevitable for those who cannot fit into real life.