GOOD HAIR Add To My Top 10

A Hairy Documentary

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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: October 09, 2009

Starring: Chris Rock, Al Sharpton, Nia Long, Dr. Maya Angelou, Salt n Pepa, and Eve

Genre: Documentary

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 95 minutes

Address Comments To:

Howard Cohen and Eric d’Arbeloff
Co-President
Roadside Attractions
421 South Beverly Drive, 8th Floor
Beverly Hills, CA 90212
Phone: (310) 789-4710;
Fax: (310) 789-4711
Website: www.roadsideattractions.com
Email: dustins@roadsideattractions.com

Content:

(BB, CC, Ab, FR, PaPa, LL, M) Strong but mixed moral worldview with moral, biblical, overt Christian, some anti-Christian, some false religious, and strong pagan elements; nine obscenities, three profanities, three racial slurs; close ups of man receiving botox injections in his face, young child in India has head shaven while he cries; simulated sex on stage and discussion of sex; women onstage in lingerie, very short shorts and bare midriffs; no alcohol; no smoking; and, vanity.

Summary:

GOOD HAIR is a documentary by Chris Rock that examines hairstyles for black women, including the trend of weaving and hair relaxing for women to appear more European. While humorous a few times, GOOD HAIR contains foul language, revealing outfits, and a mixed bag of worldviews from Christian to pagan, but the main message is moral.

Review:

GOOD HAIR is a documentary by Chris Rock that examines women’s African American hairstyles and including the trend of weaving and hair relaxing for women to appear more European. The movie starts with Rock saying that it all started when one of his young daughters said that she didn’t have “good hair.”

This begins an investigation with models, actresses, and hairdressers about what styles African American women want. It’s discovered that “relaxants” are constantly used and it proves to be a multi-million dollar enterprise for hair products for black women. The possible damaging side effects and burning pain when applied is discussed.

In fact, Rock attends a trade show for these products featuring a reality TV style competition for the best hairdresser, complete with dancing girls and special effects. Rock interviews all the contestants, who tend to be outrageous in their presentations.

On a deeper level, the movie examines why black women wish to appear to look more European than African in their hair choices.

Chris Rock comes off as a caring father, saying that he wants to make sure his daughters learn that it’s what’s inside their heads, not what’s on their heads, that matters. He references wanting to teach them not to smoke, drink, or have a baby until they’re married.

One contestant in the beauty styling contest is overtly Christian, praying in Jesus’ name frequently and directing his team to fast and pray before the competition. At times, this is presented as serious, and at other times, these statements seem to be treated comically. This contestant came in last place.

One of the other stage shows is a male hairdresser surrounded by women in bed, dressed in lingerie with a brief instance of simulated sex.

Rock travels to India where the human hair used in hair weaves is mostly exported. He discovers that a temple has women shaving their heads as a sacrifice to their god. The filmmakers point out that the ritual means that the temple then sells the hair to salons in Beverly Hills.

GOOD HAIR contains some foul language and in one scene there is discussion of female anatomy and sexual relations. Caution is warranted for these elements.

In Brief:

GOOD HAIR is a documentary by Chris Rock that examines hairstyles for black women, including the trend of weaving and hair relaxing to make them more European. The movie starts with Rock saying it all started when one of his young daughters said that she didn’t have “good hair.” This begins an investigation with models, actresses, and hairdressers about what styles African American women want. Rock attends a trade show for African American hair products, featuring a Reality TV style competition for the best hairdresser, complete with dancing girls. On a deeper side, the movie examines why black women wish to look more European than African in their hair choices.

GOOD HAIR presents a mixed bag of worldviews. One overtly Christian contestant prays in Jesus Christ’s name frequently. At times, this is presented seriously, while other times it’s treated comically. One stage show features a male hairdresser, surrounded by scantily clad women in bed, with a brief lewd moment. Caution is warranted for these elements. Chris Rock is a caring father, saying he wants to make sure his daughters learn it’s what’s inside their heads that counts, not what’s on their heads.