GRAND CANYON

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: December 27, 1991

Starring: Danny Glover, Kevin Kline, Steve Martin, Mary McDonnell, Mary-Louise Parker, & Alfre Woodard.

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 134 minutes

Address Comments To:

Content:

(LLL, VV, N, S, B) Though pointing toward a Creator God who intervenes in our lives, GRAND CANYON is weighed down by 50 obscenities & 3 profanities; man shot in leg, graphic views of surgery; female nudity; and, an adulterous relationship (discussed rather than shown).

Summary:

In GRAND CANYON, writer/director Lawrence Kasdan brings together an all-star cast to tackle complex, modern life issues with exceptional skill. Woven among various relationships (friends, married couples, and parent/child) is an exploration of the nature of societal evil, brevity of life and the possibility of miraculous interventions on our behalf by a benevolent Creator God. Drawbacks include the occasional use of intense language, brief nudity in a dream sequence, and two short but very convincing glimpses of surgery which may startle the unwary.

Review:

In GRAND CANYON, woven among various relationships is an exploration of the nature of evil, the brevity of life and miraculous interventions on our behalf. A number of story lines develop and crisscross seamlessly. Mack, a successful attorney, and his wife, Claire, struggle with their 15-year-old son's impending autonomy. When Mack's car breaks down, a tow truck driver named Simon saves him from a street gang. Meanwhile, Mack's friend Davis is a movie producer victimized by violence. After years of producing slasher flicks, the tables are turned. Adding to Mack's troubles is his secretary who tempts him with a affair. As the story unfolds, the characters ponder the possibility that divine appointments take place at life's critical moments.

GRAND CANYON has a variety of meanings, one is the Colorado landmark as a reminder that a benevolent power, far greater than human effort, ambition or evil, is very much at work in the world. With excellent acting, writing and directing, GRAND CANYON is a superior, engrossing and satisfying film. Drawbacks include the occasional intense language, brief nudity in a dream sequence, a faint nominalistic undertone, and two short glimpses of surgery which may startle the unwary.

In Brief: