HAIKU TUNNEL

Mundane “Mellowdrama”

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: September 14, 2001

Starring: Josh Kornbluth, Warren Keith & Helen Shumaker

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Older teenagers & adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 90 minutes

Address Comments To:

Michael Barker, Tom Bernard & Marcie Bloom
Co-Presidents
Sony Pictures Classics
550 Madison Avenue, 8th Floor
New York, NY 10022
(212) 833-8833
Web Page: www.spe.sony.com

Content:

(PaPa, AcapAcap, Ab, Ho, LL, S, A, D, M) Pagan worldview about an office worker trying to mail out 13 letters with some anti-Christian jokes, lightweight homosexual references & bosses described as evil with one boss appearing briefly as red-faced Satan with horns; contains 1 profanity and 22 obscenities (with 8 f-words); no violence; implied fornication, several couples shown kissing in bed (all fully clothed) & reference to couple living together; no nudity but some cleavage shown & man appears briefly in S&M outfit; drinking; smoking; and, theft; lying anti-lawyer themes, & woman curses then proudly proclaims she found Jesus.

Summary:

HAIKU TUNNEL is about a lazy temporary worker who lies, cheats and steals as he manages to fulfill his few daily duties while writing his personal novel on company time. HAIKU TUNNEL (a reference to a data-entry office project) is completely devoid of a poetic screenplay or a light at the end. Enter with extreme caution.

Review:

In HAIKU TUNNEL, Josh Kornbluth stars as aspiring writer Josh Kornbluth (get it?). HAIKU TUNNEL, then, would be better described as Josh Kornbluth’s audition tape.

Josh is a professional temporary office worker, or “temp,” who struggles to survive his first week as – gasp! – a secretary. Facing daunting challenges such as printer failures, jammed copiers and a solid day of orientation training, Josh wrestles with quitting before he is fired. This incredibly lame (and self-described) office comedy is about as fun as twisting a paper clip for 90 minutes. HAIKU TUNNEL is not a glimpse at John Q. Public, it is merely a slice-of-life from a contented underachiever. The problem is, after enduring 10 minutes of Josh’s slacker existence, viewers won’t care either. A few silly faces and a funny walk do not a comedy make.

Throughout the story, Josh describes his bosses as evil, sees them as devils and believes that lawyers “only lie, cheat and steal.” His bosses, however, are portrayed as buffoonish, but kindly. It is Josh who lies, cheats and steals as he manages to fulfill his few daily duties while writing his personal novel on company time. His greatest challenge in HAIKU TUNNEL – other than keeping the audience interested – is fighting his own procrastination tendencies long enough to mail his boss’s letters.

Josh shifts in and out of the story, sharing his observations about working life with the audience. He uses chalkboards and diagrams to explain various characters, situations and his personal decisions. Perhaps, he senses the audience may be nodding off occasionally and needs to be reminded of the funny-as-fungus storyline. One of the story’s hilarious moments occurs when Josh points out that most attorneys he has worked for have been named Bob. Isn’t that hysterical?

HAIKU TUNNEL (a reference to a data-entry project Josh once worked on) is completely devoid of a poetic screenplay or a light at the end. Enter with extreme caution.

In Brief:

In HAIKU TUNNEL, Josh Kornbluth stars as aspiring writer Josh Kornbluth (get it?). HAIKU TUNNEL would be better described as Josh Kornbluth’s audition tape. Josh is a professional temporary office worker, or “temp,” who struggles to survive his first week as a secretary. Facing daunting challenges such as printer failures, jammed copiers and a solid day of orientation training, Josh wrestles with quitting before he is fired. He lies, cheats and steals as he manages to fulfill his few daily duties while writing his personal novel on company time. This incredibly lame office comedy is about as fun as twisting a paper clip for 90 minutes. HAIKU TUNNEL is not a glimpse at John Q. Public, it is merely a slice-of-life from a contented underachiever. The problem is, after enduring 10 minutes of Josh’s slacker existence, viewers won’t care either. A few silly faces and a funny walk do not a comedy make.

HAIKU TUNNEL is a reference to a data-entry project upon which Josh once worked. It is completely devoid of a poetic screenplay or a light at the end. It contains some strong foul language, sexual immorality and anti-Christian, anti-capitalist jokes