HANSEL & GRETEL Add To My Top 10

Grim

Content -1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: October 18, 2002

Starring: Lynne Redgrave, Howie Mandel, Delta Burke, Alana Austin and Gerald McRaney.

Genre: Fantasy/Adventure

Audience: Children

Rating: PG

Runtime: 90 minutes

Address Comments To:

Steve Austin, CEO/President
TAG Distribution
4130 Cahuenga Blvd., #220
Universal City, CA 91602
Phone: (818) 985-7900
Fax: (818) 985-7901
Email: saustin@tagentertainment.com
Website: www.tagentertainment.com

Content:

(PaPa, O, B, V, A, D, M) Confused worldview with occult and pagan elements as well as a little bit of prayer; no foul language but burping and passing gas many times used for comic effect; mild comic violence as well as references to cannibalism and the wicked witch, who wants to eat children, is shown reading a book titled, “CHILDREN, THE OTHER WHITE MEAT”; no nudity but the female fairy runs around with short shorts; drinking and smoking by witch and wicked stepmother; and, docile father.


Summary:

HANSEL & GRETEL is a new version of the famous fairy tale about two children lost in the woods. It is not so much that this movie is morally bad, though it has morally bad elements, it is just grim entertainment.


Review:

If functional illiteracy has not progressed too far, then one might say that the majority of people know the story of Hansel and Gretel, the Brothers Grimm tale of lost children and a wicked witch. In this movie version, the filmmakers have lost faith in the storytelling ability of the Brothers Grimm and have confused the story so much that there is barely anything left to entertain or instruct.



This version starts out with two children in contemporary times being scared by a storm. The father decides to read to them and finds an ancient book which no one has ever seen before.



Soon the children are wrapped up in the world of the Woodsman who lives on the edge of the forest, his two children, Hansel and Gretel, and their wicked stepmother. The Woodsman heads to town to sell their last possession which Brunhelda, the stepmother, has actually stolen in a criminal sleight of hand. She, of course, leads the children into the enchanted forest. Lost, they seek the help of a screwy character named “Sandman,” played by Howie Mandel, and a serious fairy, played all too seriously by Alana Austin. They get in trouble with a wood troll and eventually make their way to the gingerbread house of the wicked witch, played wonderfully by Lynne Redgrave.



This movie is a mess. Since the premise was not formulated properly, the filmmakers don’t know where they’re going and they don’t know how to get there. To cure their distinctive plot problem, they throw in too many characters who not only have any rhyme or reason but also are dreadfully boring. To cover this up they throw in some shock scares, some flatulence and horrific references to cannibalism of little children.



The problem with this disaster is that everyone who made this are nice people. Furthermore, the actors are known for their ability and their upright parts, from Delta Burke to Gerald McRaney. Many of them have confessed faith in Christ.



It is not so much that this movie is morally bad, though it has morally bad elements, but it is just lousy entertainment. The problem is not a lack of money. The problem is not having a good script. As William Shakespeare reminds his audience, “The play is the thing that captures the attention of the king.”


In Brief:

HANSEL & GRETEL starts out with two children in contemporary times being scared by a storm. The father decides to read to them and finds an ancient book which no one has ever seen before. Soon the children are wrapped up in the world of the Woodsman who lives on the edge of the forest, his two children, Hansel and Gretel, and their wicked stepmother. The Woodsman heads to town to sell their last possession which Brunhelda, the stepmother, has actually stolen in a criminal sleight of hand. She, of course, leads the children into the enchanted forest. Lost, they have a couple adventures and eventually make their way to the gingerbread house of the wicked witch, played wonderfully by Lynne Redgrave.



This movie is a mess. Since the premise was not formulated properly, the filmmakers don’t know where they’re going and they don’t know how to get there. To cure their distinctive plot problem, they throw in too many characters who not only have any rhyme or reason but also are dreadfully boring. To cover this up they throw in some shock scares, some flatulence and horrific references to cannibalism of little children