HARRIET THE SPY

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Language        
Violence        
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Release Date: July 12, 1996

Starring: Michelle Trachtenberg, Rosie
O'Donnell, Vanessa Lee
Chester, & Gregory Smith

Genre: Drama

Audience:

Rating: PG

Runtime:

Distributor: Paramount Pictures

Director: Bronwen Hughes

Executive Producer: Debby Beece

Producer: Marykay Powell

Writer: Douglas Petrie & Theresa
Rebeck

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Content:

(B, Pa, LL, V, M) Moral worldview with one relativist statement & several references to blessings; 2 very mild profanities & 8 very mild obscenities; childlike violence like pushing & shoving; no nudity; no sex; and, teasing, lying, cheating, & stealing -- all rebuked

Summary:

HARRIET THE SPY wants to be a writer, and so she writes all sorts of observations about her friends in her notebook. One day, her classmates read her notebook and are offended at the comments about them. Harriet must learn how to say she is sorry. Aside from an unnecessary line endorsing white lies and some minor foul language, this movie is powerful morality tale.

Review:

HARRIET THE SPY wants to be a writer so she observes people and writes down everything she sees in her notebook. Golly, her Nanny, encourages her with wit and wisdom. Harriet's life is turned inside out when Golly decides it is time for her to leave. Just as Harriet is learning to make it on her own, her rival, Marion Hawthorne, finds Harriet's diary and reads her classmates all of Harriet's incisive observations about them. The truth hurts, and so her classmates attack her. Finally, Golly comes back to tell Harriet that she has to learn to say she is sorry. She does and gets a different perspective on her friends.

HARRIET THE SPY will make you laugh and cry. It portrays the truth of childhood with such vividness that you are there once again. This is a movie you will want to take your children to see to help them understand themselves. There is one unnecessary line when Golly, who has always valued the truth, tells Harriet that she must not only apologize but also lie to restore her friendships. Actually, Harriet does not have to lie. Aside from this line and some minor foul language, this movie is a powerful morality tale. There is some childish name calling and a few exclamations, but whatever is bad is rebuked as such. This is a movie for boys and girls. It is one of my top ten of all time.

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