HEAT Add To My Top 10

Content -3
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: December 15, 1995

Starring: Al Pacino, Robert De Niro, Val Kilmer, Jon Voight, Diane Venora, & Ashley Judd

Genre: Detective Drama

Audience:

Rating: R

Runtime: 174 minutes

Distributor: Warner Bros.

Director:

Executive Producer:

Producer:

Writer: Michael Mann

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Content:

(NA, LLL, VVV, SS, A, D, M) Pagan worldview of good vs. evil; 73 obscenities & 3 profanities; extensive violence including explosions, head slamming, pulling hair, punching, car chases, car crushes man, extensive deaths by gunfire (some point blank), implied murders, images of bloody corpses, & attempted suicide; 1 very briefly depicted sex scene & 1 implied scene of fornication; alcohol use; smoking; and, two depicted scenes of armed robbery

Summary:

HEAT is an over-long picture which puts Al Pacino and Robert De Niro in a genre that they know best: the detective crime drama. The plot comes right from TV detective world, but gives fine performances along with lots of violence and foul language.

Review:

HEAT is an over-long picture which puts Al Pacino and Robert De Niro in a genre that they know best: the detective crime drama. Pacino plays LAPD detective Vincent Hanna. He is on his third marriage and loves his job more than his wife. DeNiro plays experienced crook Neal McCauley who leads a team of specialized aces. The film begins with a heist on an armored truck. Neal escapes with some goods just before Vincent arrives. Vincent gets a tip which allows him to spy on Neal's next hit, but the nab is fouled when Neal bails out. Through more detective work, Vincent discovers Neal's identity. The two meet and agree that although they respect each other's commitment and zeal, they will take each other out if they meet again on a crime scene. The two go their separate ways, and the stage is set for the final showdown.

HEAT is too long. It has a lot of exposition about a lot of characters, some of whom are extraneous. HEAT, in many ways, plays like an over-long TV cop show. Unlike a TV cop show however, it shows the gritty realities of shoot outs and has both the good guys and bad guys talking with filthy language. HEAT generates interest through exact acting and character development, but could also induce sleep with its great length.

In Brief: