HOLY ROLLERS Add To My Top 10

Painfully Dragged Out

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: May 21, 2010

Starring: Jesse Eisenberg, Justin Bartha, Ari Graynor, and Danny Abeckaser

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 89 minutes

Distributor: First Independent Pictures

Director: Kevin Asch

Executive Producer: N/A

Producer: Je Gatien

Writer: Antonio Macia

Address Comments To:

Gary Rubin, President, First Independent Pictures
2999 Overland Avenue, Suite 218
Los Angeles, CA 90064
Phone: (310) 838-6555; Fax: (310) 838-9972
Website: www.firstindependentpictures.com
Email: grubin@firstindependentpictures.com

Content:

(PaPaPa, BB, LLL, VV, SS, NN, A, DDD, MM) Very strong mixed pagan worldview as a Hassidic Jew leaves his religious community and the love of his family and entices other Jews in joining him in transporting illegal drugs for the money and sex it brings, contrasted with glimpses of the Jewish Hasidic world and apparent moral transformation when protagonist goes to jail; at least 43 mostly strong obscenities (including many “f” words) and profanity of Jesus Christ’s name; strong violence includes fighting when a drug deal goes bad; strong sexual content includes frequent scenes of seduction, sexual indulgence and brief view of a pornographic movie on TV; brief upper female nudity; some alcohol use; smoking and scenes of taking drugs, transport and sale of drugs; the main character loses his innocence with lying and scandalizes his family and sensual indulgence.

Summary:

HOLY ROLLERS is a small independent movie about a young rabbinic Jewish student who is seduced into becoming a drug smuggler. The plot is predictable and the seduction of a young man is painfully dragged out, with lots of strong foul language, violence, lewd content, and drug references.

Review:

HOLY ROLLERS is an independent movie about a fall from innocence.

In the story, a young rabbinic student named Sam Gold is enticed to transport drugs between New York and Europe. His initial understanding was that he was legally transporting medicine. When he becomes aware that he is really transporting illegal drugs, Sam decides to continue transporting the drugs because of the money and the sexual seduction involved.

Despite challenges by a rabbi teacher, his father and a close friend, he falls deeper into the drug world by beginning to recruit other Hasidic Jews to become drug carriers. When he finds he is about to be arrested, he conveniently repents of what he’s done. The movie ends with the revelation that it is based on a real story about a ring of Hasidic Jews transporting the drug Ecstasy.

The quality of the writing in HOLY ROLLERS is forced and improbable. The naiveté of the young man, Sam Gold, was presented well. His willingness to leave his Jewish tradition and the love of his family as he loses his sense of right and wrong will leave media-wise viewers with a deep sadness. His fall seems improbable.

The depravity of the drug world is heard with repeated cuss words, profanity and sexual seduction.

HOLY ROLLERS shows viewers glimpses of the Jewish Hasidic world. Its strict moral stance is seen in sharp contrast with the evils of the drug world. Although the movie ends with Sam Gold in prison and seemingly wanting to return to God, its portrayal of drugs, cheating and sexual seduction dominate the story and characters in a painful manner. The story is basically a view of a fall from innocence into the clutches of our sinful nature. The journey is tedious and predictable, however.

In Brief:

HOLY ROLLERS is an independent movie about a fall from innocence. A young rabbinic Jewish student, Sam Gold, is enticed to transport drugs between New York and Europe thinking he is legally transporting medicine. When he becomes aware what’s happening, Sam decides to continue transporting the drugs because the money is good and sexual seduction is involved.

The quality of the writing in HOLY ROLLERS is forced and improbable. The naiveté of the young man, Sam Gold, is presented well. His willingness to leave his Jewish tradition and the love of his family as he loses his sense of right and wrong will leave media-wise viewers with a deep sadness. His fall is improbable. Also, the drug world’s depravity is shown explicitly with repeated cuss words, profanity, violence, and sexual seduction. There are glimpses of the Jewish Hasidic world. Its strict moral stance is seen in sharp contrast with the evils of the drug world. Although the story ends with Sam Gold in prison and seemingly wanting to return to God, the portrayal of drugs, cheating and sexual seduction painfully dominates everything. The journey in HOLY ROLLERS is tedious and improbably predictable.