HONEY, I BLEW UP THE KID

Content +4
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: July 17, 1992

Starring: Rick Moranis, Marcia
Strassman, Daniel & Joshua
Shalikar, Robert Oliveri,
Lloyd Bridges, John Shea, and
Amy O'Neill.

Genre: Comedy

Audience: All ages

Rating: PG

Runtime: 100 minutes

Distributor: Walt Disney/Buena Vista
Pictures

Director: Randall Kleiser

Executive Producer:

Producer: Thom Eberhardt

Writer: Albert Band & Stuart Gordon

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Content:

(B, V, L) Heartwarming, extremely pro-family movie marred by a smattering of slapstick violence (hitting police officer, car hangs from top of building with passengers inside, door slammed on man's nose, reckless driving, child runs through a wall, destruction of property, exploding airplane, & girl gagged & bound) and one exclamatory profanity which could be construed as an exclamatory prayer.

Summary:

After inadvertently shrinking his children in 1989, inventor Wayne Szalinski is at it again. This time, Wayne's baby, Adam, wanders in front of his enlargement ray. Confronted by his wife, Wayne admits: "HONEY, I BLEW UP THE KID." Comic complications abound when Adam's growth skyrockets. The best family film of 1992, HONEY, I BLEW UP THE KID unfolds with brilliant execution, editing and acting performances, and presents a pro-family scenario featuring three powerful moral lessons: (1) children need moms and dads; (2) only parents have the responsibility for their children; and, (3) the world needs people who are different (even "nerdy" geniuses like Wayne).

Review:

After inadvertently shrinking his children with a particle beam in 1989, madcap inventor Wayne Szalinski is at it again. This time, Wayne's baby, Adam, wanders in front of his latest experiment: an enlargement ray. Confronted by his wife, Wayne admits: "HONEY, I BLEW UP THE KID." Meanwhile, their teenage son, Nick, is lovesick with his first teenage crush: a 14-year-old named Mandy. Comic complications abound when Adam's growth skyrockets. With Mom, Dad, Nick, and Mandy in hot pursuit, Adam heads for Las Vegas for a final showdown. In an attempt to restore Adam, the family develops a creative solution that involves hordes of police cars, an ice cream truck, a lullaby, an electromagnetic flux, and his mother's loving touch.

With surprises at every turn, HONEY, I BLEW UP THE KID unfolds with dynamic colors and special effects as well as brilliant execution, editing and acting performances. As a fantastic tall tale, it presents a pro-family scenario featuring three powerful moral lessons: (1) children need moms and dads; (2) only parents have the responsibility for their children; and, (3) the world needs people who are different (even "nerdy" geniuses like Wayne). The best family film of 1992, HONEY, I BLEW UP THE KID, with its riveting action, appeals to all generations.

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