I SHOT ANDY WARHOL Add To My Top 10

Content -4
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: May 01, 1996

Starring: Lili Taylor, Jared Harris, Stephen Dorff, & Lothaire Bluteau

Genre: Docudrama

Audience:

Rating: Unrated by MPAA

Runtime: 113 minutes

Distributor: Orion Pictures release of a Samuel Goldwyn Company Presentation

Director: Mary Harron

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Content:

(Ab, H, Pa, Ho, LLL, V, SSS, NNN, A, D, M) Anti-biblical, humanist & pagan worldviews that deal with strong feminist convictions, obsessive cult celebrity, & homosexual worldview involving lesbians, transvestites & cross-dressing; 41 obscenities, 40 vulgarities & 13 profanities; violence involving cold blooded shooting of two men, blood-splattered image of shot man & handling guns; mention of girl being sexually active at 13 years old, sexual molestations as a child, girl making sexual overtures to another woman, 2 girls kissing, 4 scenes of sex acts including one involving 2 women, monologue on sex, TV show on lesbianism, & male masturbation; full male & female nudity, several scenes of women showing their breasts, man stripping during screen test, & transvestite holding private parts; drinking & drunkeness; drug abuse & extensive cigarette smoking; and, miscellaneous immorality including attempted murder, prostitution, pan-handling, begging, depravity of lifestyles centering on celebrity idolization, drug parties & hanging out with the "in-crowd", fraud, cheating, stealing, gangs, & one blasphemous scene imitating holy communion in a drug-infested party

Summary:


Review:

I SHOT ANDY WaRHOL traces the events in Valerie Solanas' life right up to the moment when she shoots the celebrated artist on June 3, 1968. Abused as a child, she writes, as a college student, her famous Manifesto about the inferiority of men. In Manhattan, she hooks up with the king of drag queens, Candy Darling, who introduces Valerie to Andy Warhol. Obsessed with having Warhol produce her play, Valerie hounds him while enduring humiliating remarks from Worhol's groupies. She falls prey to a sleazy publisher who cons her into signing away the rights to her work. Frustrated by her inability to get her play produced, Valerie resorts to violence. Warhol survives, and she finally gets the notoriety she always sought.

In this movie, the talented cast are fascinating. Lily Taylor packs into her Valerie many eccentricities, but one wishes there was more analysis of her condition. The film also gives glimpses into the bohemian days of New York's Greenwich Village. It shows liberal acceptance of a homosexual lifestyle with lesbians, drag queens and all kinds of cross-dressing permeating daily life. Gross and promiscuous immorality involving prostitutes, pan-handling, gender changes and the aborted murder all add up to a film that shows man in his fallen state, leading a life of sin.

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