JACKSON’S RUN

Consequences

Content -1
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: June 29, 2013

Starring: Rusty Martin, T.C. Stallings,
Chris Robinson, Melissa Todd,
Noah McCullough, Dirk Griffin

Genre: Drama

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: Not Rated

Runtime: 103 minutes

Distributor: New Providence
Entertainment/Christian Movies

Director: Dan Lennox

Executive Producer: Chris Robinson

Producer: Clif [sic] White, Ollie Ballew

Writer: Chris Robinson, Dan Lennox

Address Comments To:

Rich Christiano

ChristianMovies.com

Christiano Film Group, Inc.

P.O. Box 553

Lake Forest, CA 92609-0553

Email: www.christianmovies.com


Content:

(CCC, BBB, VV, AA, DD, M) Extreme Evangelical Christian, biblical worldview about being saved by Jesus Christ, forgiving one another and overcoming tragedy; no foul language; strong violence includes Iraq wartime battle with young children getting shot and people dying, intense care race trying to outrun police, man tries to hang himself, teenager punches out his father, teenage boys gang up on another teenager and hit him, teenager dies of HIV; bedroom shot of husband and wife but nothing salacious shown, childhood romance but nothing salacious shown, some comments about sexual relationships but nothing offensive; no nudity; alcoholic mother so alcohol use to get drunk; drug sales, drug addiction; and, young man got HIV from shooting up with drugs at a young age, anger, rebellion, disrespect for parents, and avoidance of responsibility but all rebuked.




Summary:

JACKSON’S RUN is an emotional, gritty drama about the troubled, AIDS afflicted son of a homeless soldier who resents his father. Though it tries to force too many stories into its 84 minutes, JACKSON’S RUN is one of the better Christian movies showing the next generation there are consequences to our actions and a bigger answer to our problems.




Review:

JACKSON’S RUN opens with a terrific Iraqi war scene where a soldier pursues a firefight into an Iraqi home where the men are building weapons, but the collateral damage includes children.

Cut to 12 years later. Jackson is clearly the son of the soldier featured in the opening. He’s leading the police on a frenetic, frightening car chase. When he comes back from police custody, his school tells him he’s going to go to a special institution school for troubled youth headed up by a black pastor, where he’ll be doing a manual work program taking care of homeless people.

Jackson is angry. He goes the first day and then skips a day to hang out with his drug buddies, who sell drugs. When he comes home that night, the police pick him up and throw him in jail. As the police haul him away, he screams at his mom that he hates her. Sadly, he has even betrayed the trust of his younger brother, Liam.

In prison, the pastor, Chris Daniels, comes to talk to him. He says that he was in the jail before and wrote some of the graffiti on the wall, but God saved him. Jackson wants no part of him, but to get out of jail, he agrees to go back to the mission. A young girl takes an interest in Jackson, but in one scene, it is revealed that he has contracted HIV and AIDS from a dirty drug needle.

All his life Jackson has been angry that his father, Nick, left him to go to Iraq. Nick promised to return, but he never did. As if by God’s grace, Nick turns out to be one of the homeless people at the mission. When Jackson finds out, he punches him out. Can Jackson forgive? Can Jackson find peace with Jesus Christ? Can Jackson learn to love others more than himself?

JACKSON’S RUN is a surprisingly interesting, tough, gritty, emotional movie. The dialogue is particularly good, and the jeopardy is always intense. What keeps it from being four stars is the filmmaker tries to force too many stories into 84 minutes. That said, JACKSON’S RUN is one of the better movies to show the next generation there are consequences to our actions and a bigger answer to our problems.

In Brief:

JACKSON’S RUN is an emotional, gritty drama about the troubled son of a homeless soldier who resents his father. All his life Jackson has been angry that his father, Nick, left him to go to Iraq. Nick promised to return but never did. In one scene, it is revealed that Jackson contracted AIDS from a dirty drug needle. As if by God’s grace, his father turns out to be one of the homeless people at a mission where a judge orders Jackson to serve some community time. When Jackson finds out, he punches his father. Can Jackson forgive his father? Can Jackson find peace with Jesus Christ? Can Jackson learn to love others more than himself?


JACKSON’S RUN is an interesting, tough, gritty, emotional movie. The dialogue is particularly good, and the jeopardy is always intense. What keeps it from being four stars is the filmmaker tries to force too many stories into 84 minutes. That said, JACKSON’S RUN is one of the better Christian movies showing the next generation there are consequences to our actions and a bigger answer to our problems.