JANIE JONES Add To My Top 10

Excessive Foul Language

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: October 28, 2011

Starring: ** Excessive Foul Language **

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: Not Rated

Runtime: 114 minutes

Address Comments To:

Tribeca Film aka Tribeca Films
375 Greenwich Street
New York, NY 10013
Phone: (212) 941-2000
Website: www.tribecafilm.com
Email: info@tribecafilm.com

Content:

(C, B, PaPaPa, LLL, V, S, N, AAA, DD, MM) Light redemptive, moral worldview about 13-year-old daughter who helps hard-drinking, foul-mouthed father reform his ways; at least 150 obscenities (mostly “f” words), 20 strong profanities and several light profanities; brief violence includes lead male character, a rock singer, gets punched by band mate and knocked down, rock singer also instigates a fight with his guitarist onstage, and a drunk audience member threatens the singer, which causes the singer to jump offstage into the crowd and nearly get beaten until his daughter begs the audience member to spare him; rock singer accuses band member of sleeping with singer’s girlfriend; upper male nudity; frequent drinking and drunkenness; smoking and a few scenes of marijuana use or discussion of marijuana smoking in a favorable light; and, strong miscellaneous immorality includes constant arguing, lead male character often acts like a jerk, drug-addicted mother drops 13-year-old daughter with father who didn’t know about her, and mean spirited comments.


Summary:

JANIE JONES tells the story of a 13-year-old girl who helps her alcohol-abusing, foul-mouthed, rock singing father become a better person. JANIE JONES is too dramatically flat to be truly involving, and its foul language is excessive and offensive.


Review:

JANIE JONES is a low-key, low-budget character-based film set against the music world. It appears to want to be another CRAZY HEART but falls short because its lead character is too unpleasant for too much of the movie and the plotting is too thin and reliant on several full-length songs to pad the running time. Very frequent foul language and drunkenness, along with some pot references, will turn off media-wise viewers, despite the lead male character’s change of heart toward the end.
The movie tells the story of a 13-year-old girl named Janie Jones. Janie’s drug-addicted mother (Elisabeth Shue) abandons her with Janie’s rock star father, Ethan (Alessandro Nivola), whose career is spiraling downward and who never knew he had a child. Forced by a policeman to take responsibility for Janie, Ethan and his band have her hit the road with them in their tour bus. When the obnoxious, self-centered singer drives his band to quit and his record label drops him, he’s stuck alone with Janie in a used car he has to drive from gig to gig. At first, he’s deeply unhappy with having to take responsibility for her, but Janie shows Ethan unconditional love and respect. So, he warms to her and winds up developing a touching father-daughter relationship that helps him mellow and become a better person.
The central relationship in JANIE JONES hinges on Janie’s innate ability as a young singer-songwriter, which impresses her father and leads to their performing together professionally. While the acting is solid, the story is too paper-thin and reliant on full-length songs to pad the running time. Also, the father’s character is a painfully unpleasant individual for most of the movie. JANIE JONES is too dramatically flat to truly be involving, and its excessive profanity and alcohol abuse is offensive to media-wise viewers. Although the father appears to sober up and even becomes nicer and talks with a clean mouth by the end, none of this is explicitly addressed.


In Brief:

JANIE JONES tells the story of 13-year-old girl Janie Jones. Janie’s drug-addicted mother abandons her with Janie’s rock star father, Ethan, whose career is spiraling downward and never knew about Janie. Forced by a policeman to take responsibility for Janie, Ethan and his band hit the road with her in their tour bus. When the obnoxious, self-centered singer drives his band to quit, he’s stuck alone with Janie in a used car he has to drive from gig to gig. At first, Ethan’s deeply unhappy having to take responsibility for Janie, but she shows him unconditional love and respect. So, he warms to her and develops a touching father-daughter relationship that helps him mellow and become a better person.
The central relationship in JANIE JONES hinges on Janie’s innate ability as a young singer-songwriter, which impresses her father and leads to them performing together. While the acting is solid, the story is too paper-thin and reliant on full-length songs to pad the running time. Also, the father’s character is painfully unpleasant for most of the movie. JANIE JONES is too dramatically flat to be truly involving, and its excessive profanity is offensive.