JURY DUTY

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 14, 1995

Starring: Pauly Shore, Tia Carrere,
Brian Doyle-Murray, Stanley
Tucci, Abe Vigoda, Charles
Napier, & Shelley Winters

Genre: Comedy

Audience:

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 85 minutes

Distributor: TriStar Pictures

Director: John Fortenberry

Executive Producer:

Producer: Yoram Ben-Ami & Peter M.
Lenkov

Writer: Neil Tilkin, Barbara Williams
& Samantha Adams

Address Comments To:

Content:

(H, E, LL, V, S, NN, A, Ho) Humanism; humorous environmentalism -- motive for murder is that victims used polystyrene; 3 profanities & 18 vulgarities; action violence -- two men zapped with stun gun, man hit on head & falls over balcony, main character threatened & pushed; male stripping, partial male nudity & brief male nudity; champagne sipped at jury party; and, implied male homosexual act.

Summary:

JURY DUTY features Pauly Shore as a failed male stripper looking for an easy ride through life. He finds it when he is called for jury duty in a lengthy mass-murder trial. The movie's cheap (and few) laughs hinge on juvenile sound and sight gags. This movie limps along. Watch court TV. It is cheaper and more intelligent.

Review:

The verdict is in: Hollywood should get the maximum sentence for producing the movie JURY DUTY. Saturday Night Live alum Pauly Shore stars as an unemployed slacker and failed male stripper who sees long-term jury duty in a mass-murder trial as a career opportunity. His saving fate is the "Drive-thru Killer" trial, in which seven fast-food restaurant managers have been murdered for their wanton use of non-biodegradable materials. Not surprisingly, the movie spews forth a stream of barely connected juvenile sound and sight gags to produce a scant handful of cheap laughs.

Why Hollywood is trying to make Pauly Shore a star defies all understanding. Shore delivers his lines in a monotone, and his eyes stay at half-mast the entire movie. He is easily upstaged by Peanut, the Jeopardy-obsessed dog Shore continuously threatens with a trip to the animal lab. If the O.J. Simpson trial did not exist, this movie probably would not either. The prosecutor is even a Marcia Clark look-alike. Other characterizations are paper-thin. Brian Doyle-Murray tries the hardest as the scruffy, deranged looking accused killer, but his only "star turn" comes when Shore, dressed as his girlfriend, arrives ostensibly for a conjugal visit. The two simulate a make-out session, and it is implied that he assaults Tommy sexually.

In Brief: