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© Baehr, 2015

Release Date: April 14, 1995

Starring: Pauly Shore, Tia Carrere,
Brian Doyle-Murray, Stanley
Tucci, Abe Vigoda, Charles
Napier, & Shelley Winters

Genre: Comedy


Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 85 minutes

Distributor: TriStar Pictures

Director: John Fortenberry

Executive Producer:

Producer: Yoram Ben-Ami & Peter M.

Writer: Neil Tilkin, Barbara Williams
& Samantha Adams

Address Comments To:


(H, E, LL, V, S, NN, A, Ho) Humanism; humorous environmentalism -- motive for murder is that victims used polystyrene; 3 profanities & 18 vulgarities; action violence -- two men zapped with stun gun, man hit on head & falls over balcony, main character threatened & pushed; male stripping, partial male nudity & brief male nudity; champagne sipped at jury party; and, implied male homosexual act.


JURY DUTY features Pauly Shore as a failed male stripper looking for an easy ride through life. He finds it when he is called for jury duty in a lengthy mass-murder trial. The movie's cheap (and few) laughs hinge on juvenile sound and sight gags. This movie limps along. Watch court TV. It is cheaper and more intelligent.


The verdict is in: Hollywood should get the maximum sentence for producing the movie JURY DUTY. Saturday Night Live alum Pauly Shore stars as an unemployed slacker and failed male stripper who sees long-term jury duty in a mass-murder trial as a career opportunity. His saving fate is the "Drive-thru Killer" trial, in which seven fast-food restaurant managers have been murdered for their wanton use of non-biodegradable materials. Not surprisingly, the movie spews forth a stream of barely connected juvenile sound and sight gags to produce a scant handful of cheap laughs.

Why Hollywood is trying to make Pauly Shore a star defies all understanding. Shore delivers his lines in a monotone, and his eyes stay at half-mast the entire movie. He is easily upstaged by Peanut, the Jeopardy-obsessed dog Shore continuously threatens with a trip to the animal lab. If the O.J. Simpson trial did not exist, this movie probably would not either. The prosecutor is even a Marcia Clark look-alike. Other characterizations are paper-thin. Brian Doyle-Murray tries the hardest as the scruffy, deranged looking accused killer, but his only "star turn" comes when Shore, dressed as his girlfriend, arrives ostensibly for a conjugal visit. The two simulate a make-out session, and it is implied that he assaults Tommy sexually.

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