KAZAAM

Content -1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: July 19, 1996

Starring: Shaquille O'Neal , Francis
Capra , Aly Walker, &
Marshall Manesh

Genre: Fantasy

Audience:

Rating: PG

Runtime: 93 minutes

Distributor: Touchstone Pictures

Director: Paul M. Glaser EXECUTIVE
PRODUCERS: Ted Field, Robert
W. Cort , Leonard Armato , &
Shaquille O'Neal

Executive Producer:

Producer: Ted Field, Robert W. Cort ,
Leonard Armato , & Shaquille
O'Neal PRODUCERS: Scott
Kroopf , Paul M. Glaser &
Bob Engelman

Writer: Christian Ford & Roger Soffer

Address Comments To:

Content:

(NA, L, V, O, M) New Age worldview that encourages children to seek out the good within themselves & to become happy & at one with the universe; 2 obscenities & 7 vulgarities; mild but gratuitous violence involving fist fights & chases by bullies; and, magical elements & scenes of urban decay

Summary:

KAZAAM stars basketball star Shaquille O'Neil as a wish granting genie. The recipient of these wishes is young Max who uses Kazaam to help him find his long-lost father. This movie is a bad attempt at comedy, fantasy and action that tries to be all things to all people, yet fails. Due to some excessively vulgar language, unnecessary violence and an unmistakably New Age slant, the movie falls far short of a movie for children, despite a few moral elements.

Review:

In KAZAAM, basketball hero Shaquille O'Neil plays a wish-granting genie. The recipient of these wishes is Max, a twelve-year-old boy growing up in New York City. Max struggles with the prospect of a new father and is constantly bothered by a local hoodlum gang. Max's father abandoned him when he was two-years-old, but Max still holds onto hope that he might find his father again. As the film opens, Max is on the run from the school gang. He hides in an old building and finds Kazaam. Kazaam must grant Max three wishes. Max asks for a Jaguar XKE. Next, Max asks for junk food. Max finally wishes for a reunion with his father, but Kazaam is distracted. Kazaam finally comes to the rescue and serves up a plateful of special-effects to save the day.

This is a movie that is unapologetically about magic. It is also perhaps a little too dark and brooding to be enjoyed by small children, and the dialogue and story are too juvenile for older children. It is a bad attempt at comedy, fantasy and action that tries to be all things to all people, yet fails. Due to some excessively vulgar language, unnecessary violence and an unmistakably New Age slant, the movie falls far short of a movie for children, despite a few moral elements.

In Brief: