KING'S RANSOM Add To My Top 10

Terrible Farce

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 22, 2005

Starring: Anthony Anderson, Jay Mohr, Donald Faison, Regina Hall, and Loretta Devine

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13 for crude and sexual
humor and language

Runtime: 93 minutes

Distributor: New Line Cinema

Director: Jeff Byrd

Executive Producer: Jeromy Barber, Mike Drake, Matt Moore, and Luke Ryan

Producer: Darryl Taja

Writer: Wayne Conley

Address Comments To:

Mark Ordesky, President
Fine Line Features
Robert Shaye and Michael Lynne
Co-Chairman/Co-CEO
New Line Cinema
116 North Robertson Blvd.
Suite 200
Los Angeles, CA 90048
Phone: (310) 854-5811
Fax: (310) 854-1453
Web Page: www.flf.com

Content:

(PaPa, C, Ho, LLL, V, S, A, D, MMM) Strong pagan worldview where lying and cheating are acceptable ways to get what you want, with one character who is a recently converted Christian; some homosexual insinuations; 44 mostly minor obscenities and three profanities; slapstick violence, and gun pulled on kidnapping victim; sexual innuendo, including some insinuations that a prisoner engaged in homosexual activity, and fornication implied lightly; upper male nudity when a man takes a bubble bath; alcohol at party; cigarette and cigar smoking; and extreme greed, extreme lying and fraud, revenge, kidnapping, and fractious divorce proceedings.

Summary:

KING’S RANSOM is an astonishingly unfunny, poorly made farce about a CEO who attempts to fake his own kidnapping so that he can withhold money from his wife once they are divorced. With lots of lightweight foul language and sexual jokes, plus a self-centered worldview, it’s a throwaway movie in every sense.

Review:

KING’S RANSOM is an astonishingly unfunny, poorly made farce about a CEO who attempts to fake his own kidnapping so that he can withhold money from his wife once they are divorced. His plan goes awry when three other people try to kidnap him for their own greedy or vengeful reasons.

Anthony Anderson plays Malcolm King, the owner of his own company. He’s rich, shallow, obnoxious, and mean to everyone he comes across. Although his wife is very similar, they are divorcing, and he is trying everything he can to prevent her from getting a big slice of his money. A news story gives him sudden inspiration. If he fakes his own kidnapping and pays a hefty ransom, he will have less money to split with his wife.

His wife also finds it opportunistic to kidnap Malcolm, however, as does a disgruntled employee and a penniless loser. The three would-be kidnappers struggle to be the ones to actually kidnap Malcolm, though Malcolm still believes he has set up his own kidnapping.

Miraculously, the acting in this movie is almost as witless and inept as the writing. The characters are a hodgepodge of selfish rich people and urban gangster clichés. The humor is sophomoric and obvious. One running joke features an elderly woman farting and drooling, which is about as funny as the movie gets. Also, the movie is xenophobic from an African-American viewpoint, depicting Asians as petty and greedy, white people as dim-witted, and retarded people as pathetic servants.

All of the characters act self-centeredly and without any logic. Morality is as easy for them as “I do what I want.” Grouped with the stream of lightweight foul language and awkward sexual jokes, KING’S RANSOM is a throwaway movie in every sense.

In Brief:

KING’S RANSOM is an astonishingly unfunny, poorly made farce about a CEO who attempts to fake his own kidnapping so that he can withhold money from his wife once they are divorced. His plan goes awry when three other people try to kidnap him for their own greedy or vengeful reasons. Anthony Anderson plays Malcolm King, the owner of his own company. He’s rich, shallow, obnoxious, and mean to everyone. Although his wife is very similar, they are divorcing, and he is doing everything he can to prevent her from getting a big slice of his money. A news story gives him sudden inspiration: if he fakes his own kidnapping and pays a hefty ransom, he will have less money to split with his wife.

Miraculously, the acting in this movie is almost as witless and inept as the writing. The characters are a hodgepodge of selfish rich people and urban gangster clichés. All of the characters act self-centeredly and without any logic. Morality is as easy for them as “I do what I want.” With lots of lightweight foul language and sexual jokes, KING’S RANSOM is a throwaway movie in every sense.