KON-TIKI Add To My Top 10

A Movie About Faith, But Not in God

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 26, 2013

Starring: Pal Sverre Hagen, Anders Baasmo Christiansen, Gustaf Skarsgard, Odd Magnus Williamson, Tobias Santelmann, Jakob Oftebro, Agnes Kittelsen, Eleanor Burke, Manuel Cauchi

Genre: Action Adventure

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 101 minutes

Address Comments To:

Bob and Harvey Weinstein, Co-Chairmen, The Weinstein Company (Radius-TWC/Dimension Films)
345 Hudson Street, 13th Floor
New York, NY 10014
Phone: (646) 862-3400; Fax: (917) 368-7000
Website: www.weinsteinco.com

Content:

(HH, PaPa, Ab, L, V, N, A, D, M) Strong humanist worldview with overt pagan references and pagan worldview, man goes on a seemingly suicidal mission for self validation and prideful goals, multiple references to having faith in Tiki the sun god, plus one man says “Thank God,” but he’s corrected by a woman who says, “God had nothing to do with it”; three obscenities, plus man urinates and vomits; men catch a shark and violently stab it and cut it open; kissing between married couple; husband and wife bath in natural spring, partial upper female nudity from the back, upper male nudity in much of the movie; light drinking; light smoking; and, men are on a seemingly suicidal mission for a meaningless cause.

Summary:

KON-TIKI tells the true story of Norwegian adventurer Thor Heyerdahl, who decides to sail a handmade raft across 5000 miles of dangerous sea to prove a theory about the history of people in Peru and Polynesia. KON-TIKI is visually stunning with remarkable CGI effects and a fascinating historical story, but it has a strong humanist worldview with pagan references that warrant strong or extreme caution.

Review:

KON-TIKI tells the true story of Thor Heyerdahl, a young Norwegian scientist and adventurer who after spending some time on the South Sea Islands comes up with a crazy theory about the origins of Polynesia. All authorities on the subject of ethnography agree that Polynesians originated from Asia, but Thor seems to think that Peruvians from South America were the original habitants of the islands.



He takes his evidences to all the Anthropological publications, but none of them believe his theory due to one simple fact, the ancient South Americans had no way of traveling across the sea to Polynesia. Their only form of water transportation were small wooden rafts, which so-called experts think would be impossible to sail across 5000 miles of treacherous seas. Thor, still convinced of his theory, decides to put it to a test.



He, along with five other men, build a handmade raft using only materials that the ancient Peruvians would have. If Thor’s theory is correct, the voyage is possible. If not, it’s likely they will die. By the time they are ready to set sail, it seems as if the whole world is watching them, ready to see what comes of this suicidal endeavor.



The voyage begins and the patience of men begins to wear. If Thor’s theory proves to be false, their lives are likely over. Meanwhile, the determined Thor has his own demons to face, including his secret fear of water, and the fact he can’t swim!



KON-TIKI is visually stunning with CGI and special effects that make this grand adventure feel real and authentic. Unlike the similar “lost at sea” movie LIFE OF PI, which is more fantastical and dreamlike rather than realistic. The quality that the filmmakers attained on such a low budget compared to Hollywood’s standards is quite remarkable. Some dialogue comes off as overly dramatic and unnecessary, but the overall movie is very entertaining.



Sadly, the movie has some strong pagan and humanistic worldviews. Many times Thor tells his fellow adventurers to have faith in Tiki, the Incan sun god. He also jeopardizes the lives of five men for a seemingly insignificant cause that comes off as selfish. Though he refuses to give up, risking his life for self-validation isn’t fair to his wife and two kids. KON-TIKI has light foul language and only one violent scene, but its humanist worldview warrants strong or extreme caution.

In Brief:

KON-TIKI tells the true story of Thor Heyerdahl, a young Norwegian adventurer in the late 1940s. After spending time on the South Sea Islands, Thor comes up with a crazy theory that Polynesians originated from Peru. He takes his evidences to all the anthropology publications, but none of them believe his theory due to one simple fact – the ancient South Americans had no way of traveling across the sea to Polynesia. To prove his theory, Thor builds a handmade raft and sets sail across 5000 miles of dangerous sea.

KON-TIKI is visually stunning. Special CGI effects make this grand adventure feel authentic. The quality that the filmmakers attained on such a low budget compared to Hollywood’s standards is remarkable. Some dialogue comes off as overly dramatic, but the movie is very entertaining. Sadly, the movie has a strong humanist worldview with strong pagan references. Though Thor refused to give up, risking his life for self-validation wasn’t fair to his wife and two kids. KON-TIKI has light foul language and only one violent scene, but its humanist worldview requires strong or extreme caution.