LANTANA Add To My Top 10

Lack of Trust Breeds Faithlessness and Tragedy

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: December 14, 2001

Starring: Anthony LaPaglia, Geoffrey Rush, Barbara Hershey, Kerry Armstrong, Rachael Blake, Vince Colosimo, Leah Purcell, & Daniela Farinacci

Genre: Drama/Mystery

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 120 minutes

Distributor: Lion’s Gate Films

Director: Ray Lawrence

Executive Producer: Rainer Mockert & Mikael Borglund

Producer: Jan Chapman

Writer: Andrew Bovell

Address Comments To:

Tom Ortenberg, President
Lions Gate Releasing
5750 Wilshire Blvd., #501
Los Angeles, CA 90036
Phone: (323) 692-7300
Fax: (323) 692-7373
Website: www.lionsgatefilms.com

Content:

(BB, C, Ho, LLL, V, SS, NN, A, D, M) Solid moral worldview with redemptive elements supporting marriage & rebuking infidelity, plus psychiatrist talks disdainfully with promiscuous homosexual patient; 37 mostly strong obscenities & 7 mostly strong profanities; mostly implied violence including image of dead woman, man jogging accidentally knocks over another man, bloodying both their faces, attempted, & another accident causes tragedy; depicted adultery, attempted rape & homosexual discusses having an affair with a man who’s married with several children; partial nudity during sex acts; alcohol use; smoking; and, lying & adultery eventually rebuked.


Summary:

LANTANA is an Australian movie that uses the crime-story format to study four sets of married couples. Strong sex scenes and foul language spoil LANTANA’s redemptive themes and moral worldview.


Review:

The lantana bush in Australia is a lovely plant, filled with exotic, beautiful flowers. Beneath this beauty, however, lies a thick thorny growth.
The Australian movie LANTANA opens with an image of a dead woman’s body underneath some lantana bushes. LANTANA then turns its attention to police detective Leon Zat, played by Anthony LaPaglia, who was so marvelous in BETSY’S WEDDING and won a Tony Award for his starring role in Arthur Miller’s A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE in 1998. Detective Zat is consumed with guilt about cheating on his wife, Sonja (Kerry Armstrong), who is secretly seeing a psychiatrist, played by Barbara Hershey. The psychiatrist, Valerie, is having problems with her own marriage to her psychiatrist husband, John, played by Geoffrey Rush from SHINE. Valerie and John have not yet recovered from losing their little girl, who was found murdered in an alley. Detective Zat’s mistress, Jane, is separated herself from her friendly husband Pete because she’s apparently bored with him. The only happy couple in this movie seem to be Jane’s next door neighbors, Nik and Paula, a young, working class couple struggling to get by with three small children.
Detective Zat and his partner, Claudia, who’s still searching for a mate, become embroiled in a missing persons investigation. Their investigation will have important consequences for all of these characters. Although tragedy strikes one of the married couples, and threatens another one, it strengthens the bonds between one couple and renews the bonds of another. In the end, LANTANA rebukes infidelity and extols marriage and family.
LANTANA is the kind of drama that builds in power slowly as it goes along. This will be especially true for moral moviegoers, who have to endure some fairly graphic sex scenes and foul language as they get to the movie’s redemptive second half. The major theme in the movie is how lack of trust can erode the bonds of matrimony and family. In fact, lack of trust actually results in one person’s death. LANTANA also brilliantly shows how lack of trust in a marriage can build a wall of separation between a couple. That wall is never more clear than in one important sequence where one spouse is forced to relay messages to their spouse by leaving urgent messages on an answering machine – or should we say “unanswering machine?”
Anthony LaPaglia is positively brilliant in his role as the conflicted, philandering Detective Zat. Through his investigation, Detective Zat finally realizes the redemptive value of having a healthy marriage, and he gains viewers’ sympathies as he tries to pick up the pieces of his failed relationship with Sonja. As he does this, viewers will root for him, and screenwriter Andrew Bovell and director Ray Lawrence deliver a powerful, heartfelt, positive denouement. Kerry Armstrong and Barbara Hershey as Zat’s wife and her psychiatrist also deliver marvelous performances.
Some judicious editing of the gratuitous sex scenes and foul language would have greatly improved LANTANA. Also, the movie’s redemptive scenes would have played even more strongly if the filmmakers had dared to include some timely Christian or scriptural references in their movie. As the Prophet Isaiah says in Isaiah 63:16, “You, O Lord, are our Father and our Redeemer.”


In Brief:

LANTANA is an Australian movie that uses the crime-story format to study four sets of married couples. Anthony LaPaglia plays police detective Leon Zat, who, consumed with guilt about cheating on his wife, becomes embroiled in a missing persons investigation involving three other married couples. Although tragedy strikes one of the married couples and threatens another one, it strengthens the bonds between one couple and forces Detective Zat to realize how a healthy marriage and family can provide people with a solid foundation for their lives.
LANTANA is the kind of drama that builds in power as it goes along. The major theme in the movie is how lack of trust can erode the bonds of matrimony and family. Anthony LaPaglia is positively brilliant in his role as the conflicted, philandering Detective Zat. Screenwriter Andrew Bovell and director Ray Lawrence deliver a powerful, heartfelt, positive denouement that rebukes infidelity and extols marriage and family. Some judicious editing of the gratuitous sex scenes and foul language would have greatly improved LANTANA. Also, the movie’s redemptive scenes would have played even more strongly if the filmmakers had dared to include some timely Christian or scriptural references in their movie