LEAP YEAR

Cute Romantic Comedy

Content -1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: January 08, 2010

Starring: Amy Adams, Matthew Goode, John Lithgow, Kaitlin Olson, and Adam Scott

Genre: Romantic Comedy

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG

Runtime: Not Available

Address Comments To:

Jeffrey R. Immelt, Chairman/CEO, General Electric
Jeff Zucker, President/CEO, NBC Universal
(A division of General Electric)
Ron Meyer, President/COO, Universal Studios
Adam Fogelson, Chairman, Universal Pictures
100 Universal City Plaza
Universal City, CA 91608-1085
Phone: (818) 777-1000
Web Page: www.universalstudios.com

Content:

(BB, Ro, C, L, V, N, AA, M) Strong moral worldview with some Romantic elements where couple chooses marriage over just having a relationship and inn owners only want to let married couples stay at their inn, with a church wedding scene where a Christian pastor conducts the ceremony; seven light obscenities and one use of the Lord’s name in vain; one fight scene rescuing a suitcase from thieves; no depicted or implied sex scenes, but there is a scene of an unmarried couple forced to share a bed and another couple has had a four-year relationship without getting married; upper male nudity and woman is in a shower behind a semi-transparent curtain; heavy drinking at a wedding to the point of vomiting, a main character operates a pub, and social drinking in other scenes as well; no smoking; and, dishonesty and couple poses as married in order to get a room at an inn.

Summary:

LEAP YEAR stars Amy Adams as an American girl looking to propose marriage to her boyfriend while visiting Ireland, when she finds romance with another man. Amy Adams and Matthew Goode shine in this cute, well-done romantic comedy, which honors marriage and opposes sex outside of marriage but contains brief foul language and some heavy drinking in one scene.

Review:

Amy Adams and Matthew Goode shine in the cute romantic comedy LEAP YEAR. While the romance is not what you would recommend for your own Christian children, the movie does honor the institution of marriage and opposes sex outside of marriage.

The movie opens with Anna (Amy Adams) in a four-year relationship with Jeremy (Adam Scott) a workaholic doctor. Anna wants to get married and thinks Jeremy is about to propose, but instead he gives her diamond earrings and flies off to a convention in Ireland. Amy learns of an old Irish tradition that women can propose to men on February 29 (which only comes on leap years). She flies to Ireland to propose to Jeremy.

Anna’s plane is diverted by a major storm, and she has to try to get across country to Dublin to make her proposal. Circumstances result in the only ride available being from Declan (Matthew Goode) the handsome young owner of a struggling pub. As can be anticipated they fight like cats and dogs but wind up falling in love. Obviously, this classic conflict and its resolution provide ample opportunity for comedy and romance. Amy Adams and Matthew Goode pull it off very well.

One refreshing scene features an innkeeper who only wants to rent rooms to married couples. Thankfully, the police did not come arrest them for a hate crime or even discrimination. The result is that the couple that actually dislikes each other at that point must share a small bedroom with one double bed. There is no sex shown or implied in the scene, but they do come to appreciate each other more while at the inn.

Trying to avoid a hailstorm, the couple crashes a wedding. The comedy at the wedding includes some heavy drinking to the point of throwing up. The movie includes a few light obscenities and one use of the Lord’s name in vain.

While the movie honors marriage, its concept of romance is typical of romantic comedies. When considering marriage, it is crucial to seek God’s will and to purposely build your marriage on a relationship to Jesus Christ. Marriages built on the kind of love found in 1 Corinthians 13 stand a far better chance of lasting 50 years than those built on a thrilling kiss or a weekend of fun. A good Christian marriage should see love grow and grow over the years. Marriages built on Hollywood style romance can fall apart easily.

LEAP YEAR is fun. The production values, the acting, and even the music are all first rate. Just be cautioned about a little foul language, some heavy alcohol abuse, a shower scene shown through a blurry curtain, and the usual starry-eyed kind of Hollywood romance.

In Brief:

LEAP YEAR opens with Anna in a four-year relationship with Jeremy, a workaholic doctor. Anna wants to get married and thinks Jeremy is about to propose, but instead he gives her diamond earrings and leaves for a convention in Ireland. Amy learns of an old Irish tradition that women can propose to men on February 29, which only comes on leap years. She flies to Ireland to propose to Jeremy, but her plane is diverted by a major storm. Circumstances result in the only ride available being from a handsome young owner of a struggling pub. They fight like cats and dogs but wind up falling in love. Obviously, this classic conflict and its resolution provide ample opportunity for comedy and romance.

Amy Adams and Matthew Goode shine in this cute, well-done romantic comedy. While the romance is not what you’d recommend for your own children, the movie does honor the institution of marriage and opposes sex outside of marriage. Caution should be exercised because of brief foul language, some heavy alcohol abuse in one scene, a shower scene shown through a blurry curtain, and the usual starry-eyed Hollywood romance.