LITTLE FOCKERS

Crude, Big Screen Sitcom Episode

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: December 22, 2010

Starring: Ben Stiller, Robert De Niro,
Owen Wilson, Jessica Alba,
Dustin Hoffman, Barbra
Streisand, Blythe Danner, Teri
Polo, Laura Dern

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 98 minutes

Distributor: Universal Pictures/General
Electric

Director: Paul Weitz

Executive Producer: Nancy Tenenbaum, Ryan
Kavanaugh, Daniel Lupi, Meghan
Lyvers, Adrew Miano

Producer: Jane Rosenthal, Robert De
Niro, John Hamburg, Jay Roach

Writer: Greg Glienna, Mary Ruth Clarke

Address Comments To:

Jeffrey R. Immelt, Chairman/CEO, General Electric
Jeff Zucker, President/CEO, NBC Universal
Ron Meyer, President/COO, Universal Studios
Adam Fogelson, Chairman, Universal Pictures
100 Universal City Plaza
Universal City, CA 91608-1085
Phone: (818) 777-1000
Web Page: www.universalstudios.com

Content:

(PaPa, FR, C, Ho, LLL, VV, SS, NN, AA, DD, MM) Mostly strong mixed pagan worldview, where one character integrates New Age philosophies and quotes Buddha alongside Jesus, two characters are mistaken for homosexuals in order to fill a school’s demographic quota; 16 obscenities, five strong profanities, 12 light profanities, and many allusions to “f” words interchanged with a character’s surname; strong, sometimes crude, comic violence includes man defibrillates himself with a homemade lie detector when he goes into cardiac arrest, boy vomits all over his father, man cuts his thumb while carving a turkey and blood shoots all over his family members, man has to inject a needle into another man's genitals when an erectile drug he takes lasts more than four hours and little boy walks in while the ejection is being given, boy falls from a wall-climb and breaks his arm, drunk woman pushes man into a hole in the ground then jumps on top of him knocking them both out, gymnast falls off balance pole, and son-in-law and father-in-law fight each other including punching, kicking and wrestling; strong sexual content includes major storyline involving erectile dysfunction medicine, an enema is performed but slightly sexualized by the nurse, sex toys are mentioned, and woman hosts a TV show about sexual advice, married kissing, unmarried kissing, story that a man has had an affair, married couple wants to role-play, a man takes erectile dysfunction medicine and the effects of the drug are shown in his pants, one adulterous kiss as woman forces herself on married man but he pushes her away; woman trying to seduce married man strips to her lingerie and man’s clothed crotch is focused on visually; alcohol use and drunkenness; no smoking but ED pills are taken; and, lying, secrecy, spying on people, and daughter disrespects her father.

Summary:

LITTLE FOCKERS is the third installment in the MEET THE PARENTS comedy series, with more shenanigans involving a male nurse and his suspicious father-in-law. LITTLE FOCKERS is funny at times but inconsistent, with too much crude, lewd humor and quite a bit foul language

Review:

LITTLE FOCKERS is the third installment in the MEET THE PARENTS movie series.

In this chapter, Ben Stiller’s character, Greg, and his wife Pam are settling into family life with their children. When Pam's sister announces that her husband is leaving for a younger woman, Greg's father-in-law, Jack Byrnes (played by Robert De Niro), who has been suffering from heart complications, names Greg as the next-in-line to take over the family, the God-Focker.

In order to provide financial security for his wife and children and to solidify his position as the new head of the family, Greg takes a secondary job as a spokesman for a new erectile dysfunction drug. His new sales supervisor is a beautiful young sales exec played by Jessica Alba. However, due to the nature of his new job for ED medicine, Greg does not want to tell his in-laws of the job, which of course sets his overly suspicious father-in-law into action.

Soon, Jack is trailing Greg at every turn, spying on him and suspecting Greg of adulterous behavior with the beautiful, young sales exec, which would nullify Greg's position as the next in line to lead the family.

LITTLE FOCKERS is funny but inconsistent, and it contains too much crude humor, especially since a major plot device revolves around an erectile dysfunction medication. The major plot conflict also feels episodic and more like a TV sitcom rather than a big-screen release. Also, the movie has many crude references to “f” words, which are substituted by the family's surname. The movie has a mostly mixed, Pagan worldview. One character, for instance, combines New Age philosophies with quotes from Budda and Jesus. LITTLE FOCKERS also has quite a bit of foul language as well as some drunkenness and strong miscellaneous immorality, including a daughter who disrespects her father throughout the movie.

In Brief:

LITTLE FOCKERS is the third installment in the MEET THE PARENTS movie series. In this chapter, Ben Stiller’s character, Greg, and his wife Pam are settling into family life with their children. When Pam's sister announces that her husband is leaving for a younger woman, Greg's father-in-law, Jack (played by Robert De Niro), who has been suffering from heart complications, names Greg the next in line to take over the family. To solidify his position by making more money, Greg secretly takes an embarrassing job working as spokesman for an erectile dysfunction drug company. His father-in-law becomes suspicious and suspects Greg of having an affair with the company’s beautiful sales exec.

LITTLE FOCKERS is funny but inconsistent. It contains too much crude humor, some of it involving embarrassing comic violence. The major plot conflict feels episodic and more like a TV sitcom rather than a big-screen release. There’s also quite a bit of foul language, including comic references to the “f” word in the comic hero’s surname. Finally, the movie has a mixed pagan worldview. For example, one character combines New Age philosophies with quotes from Buddha and Jesus.