LOOK WHO'S TALKING NOW

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: November 05, 1993

Distributor: TriStar Pictures

Director: Tom Ropelewski

Executive Producer:

Producer: EXECUTIVEPRODUCER: Leslie Dixon

Writer: Tom Ropelewski & Leslie Dixon

Address Comments To:

Content:

(L, N) Although actual obscenities are less than 10, the language and behavior all the way through this film contains much sexual innuendo; and, rear-female nudity (little girl runs naked after bath).

Summary:

LOOK WHO'S TALKING NOW!, while funny in spots, contains so much sexual innuendo (especially through the talking animals) that the remainder pales in comparison. Everything else considered, the film consists of mediocrity in its plot and in its acting, although little Tabitha Lupien who plays Julie, steals the show.

Review:

LOOK WHO'S TALKING NOW!, while funny in spots, contains so much sexual innuendo (especially from the talking animals) that everything else pales in comparison. It is Christmas in the Ubriacco household, but Molly (Kirstie Alley) has lost her job, while her husband, James, has just found one. He will pilot a private plane for glamorous, predatory executive Samantha whose international cosmetics firm spans the globe. The Ubriacco children, Mikey and Julie, both want a dog for Christmas, and each winds up with one: Mikey finds mongrel Rocks at the local SPCA, and Julie gets to keep Daphne, Samantha's sophisticated poodle. James spends more and more time with Samantha, and Molly becomes increasingly jealous. The stage is set for anything but a merry Christmas.

All else considered, the film consists of mediocrity. The confused plot, involving the Ubriaccos and their pets, is simply too congested and unbelievable. Travolta's and Alley's acting, too, is mediocre, although they are both capable of doing better. The children (and the dogs!) are the winners with little Tabitha Lupien as Julie stealing the show. One of the most adorable child actors since Shirley Temple, Tabitha will most likely carry this otherwise sorry film. The disgusting "dog" humor provides some laughs, but at the same time, its utter tastelessness makes for uncomfortable viewing.

In Brief: