LUCKY NUMBER SLEVIN

Too Cute for Its Own Good

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 07, 2006

Starring: Josh Hartnett, Bruce Willis,
Ben Kingsley, Morgan Freeman,
and Lucy Liu

Genre: Crime Thriller/Film Noir

Audience: Adults

Rating: TBD

Runtime: 104 minutes

Distributor: The Weinstein Co.

Director: Paul McGuigan

Executive Producer: Don Carmody, A. J. Dix and
Bill Shively

Producer: Christopher Eberts, Kia Jam,
Robert Kravis, Tyler Mitchell,
Anthony Rhulen, and Chris
Roberts

Writer: Jason Smilovic

Address Comments To:

Bob and Harvey Weinstein
Co-Chairmen
The Weinstein Company
345 Hudson Street, 13th Floor
New York, NY 10014
Phone: (646) 862-3400
Fax: (917) 368-7000
Website: www.weinsteinco.com

Content:

(PaPaPa, Ho, Ab, LLL, VVV, SS, NN, A, D, MM) Very strong dominant “anything goes” pagan worldview in which each character is motivated by lust, money and/or revenge, one character is a homosexual, one irreverent comment made about Jesus and the Virgin Mary, and one of the gangster leaders is also a rabbi; 46 mostly strong obscenities, six profanities; very graphic violence including a number of shootings, several at point-blank range, two torture scenes depicting men being suffocated with plastic bags taped over their heads, and a man’s neck is broken, plus several explosions; two brief scenes of graphic fornication, one instance of implied fornication; two scenes of upper female and upper male nudity within a sexual context, a few other scenes of naturalistic upper male nudity; brief alcohol use; brief smoking; and a strong emphasis on revenge, gambling, deception, and misrepresentation.

Summary:

LUCKY NUMBER SLEVIN is a crime thriller that follows the story of a young man who has become intertwined in a violent, cutthroat war between two infamous crime lords in New York City. While entertaining, adeptly shot and well-acted, the movie often comes across as a Tarantino rip-off, and is likewise hampered by graphic, over-the-top violence, filthy language, a very strong pagan worldview, and two brief but graphic sex scenes.

Review:

LUCKY NUMBER SLEVIN is a crime thriller that follows the story of a young man who has become intertwined in a violent, cutthroat war between two infamous crime lords in New York City. While entertaining, adeptly shot and well-acted, the movie often comes across as a Tarantino rip-off, and is likewise hampered by graphic, over-the-top violence, filthy language and two brief but graphic sex scenes.

The movie’s spider-web narrative takes a number of twists and turns, and relies on characters’ flashbacks and testimonies that aren’t always reliable. Slevin, played by Josh Hartnett, is mistaken for his friend Nick while crashing at his apartment and so is transported to the headquarters of notorious gangster The Boss (Morgan Freeman). Nick owes a large gambling debt, and The Boss expects Slevin, who happened to be at the wrong place at the wrong time, to pay it off. Assuming that Nick is a “loser” without the ability to pay his debt, Mr. Goodkat (Bruce Willis), a world class assassin, persuades The Boss to force Slevin (in lieu of Nick) to pay off his debt by serving as an accomplice in a murder.

The Boss’s son was allegedly slain by gangster rival The Rabbi (Ben Kingsley), and Slevin is assigned to help The Boss get revenge by knocking off The Rabbi’s homosexual son “The Fairy.” Meanwhile, Slevin has caught the attention of Detective Brikowski (Stanley Tucci), as well as Nick’s beautiful neighbor (Lucy Liu), albeit for different reasons, which further thickens Slevin’s already coagulated circumstances. As the story progresses, however, it becomes difficult to ascertain whether Slevin is entangled in the web, or if he’s the one actually spinning it.

Featured at the 2006 Sundance Film Festival, the chic, super-glossy LUCKY NUMBER SLEVIN picture doesn’t lack for star power, and boasts fine performances from its big names. As can be expected from an actor of his stature, Morgan Freeman handles his role with atypical grace (despite the cruelty of his character), and Bruce Willis exemplifies the cool-blue tranquility of Mr. Goodkat with naturalness and ease. While not yet as accomplished as their elders, both Josh Hartnett and Lucy Liu likewise perform at a high level. Regrettably, despite having the production budget and stellar cast to excel, the movie doesn’t live up to its potential.

Over 12 years since PULP FICTION, Hollywood still seems infatuated with Tarantino’s mixture of stylized-yet-gory violence and snappy dialogue. LUCKY NUMBER SLEVIN is yet another example, and actually uses some of Tarantino’s biggest stars in Willis and Liu. But, while clearly imitating Tarantino’s infamous excesses in vulgarity and violence, LUCKY NUMBER SLEVIN’s story, while not bad, isn’t as smart as director Paul McGuigan seems to want its audience to believe. Many of the jokes sprinkled in the dialogue are indeed clever, but evolve into a tiresome smugness as the movie progresses.

Too cute for its own good, LUCKY NUMBER SLEVIN also pushes an “anything goes” pagan worldview. The movie has no heroes of which to speak, and is littered with characters motivated by lust, money and revenge. Despite fine acting and high production values, LUCKY NUMBER SLEVIN is a movie that lacks a positive, redemptive message or positive characters, and so it will be avoided by media-wise moviegoers.

In Brief:

LUCKY NUMBER SLEVIN is a crime thriller that follows the story of a young man who has become intertwined in a violent, cutthroat war between two infamous crime lords in New York City. The movie’s spider-web narrative takes a number of turns, and relies on characters’ flashbacks and testimonies that aren’t reliable. Slevin (played by Josh Hartnett) is mistaken for his friend Nick and transported to the headquarters of notorious gangster and then is forced to be an accomplice in a murder. As the story progresses, it becomes difficult to ascertain whether Slevin is entangled in the web, or if he’s the one spinning it.

Too cute, LUCKY NUMBER SLEVIN pushes an “anything goes” pagan worldview. With no heroes of which to speak, the movie is littered with characters motivated by lust, money and revenge. Although entertaining, adeptly shot and well-acted, the movie often comes across as a Quentin Tarantino rip-off, and is hampered by graphic violence, filthy language and two brief, graphic sex scenes. Despite fine acting and high production values, this is also a movie that lacks a positive message or positive characters, and will be avoided by media-wise moviegoers.