MICMACS

Revenge – Best Served with Comedy

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: May 28, 2010

Starring: Dany Boon, Andre Dussollier,
Nicolas Marie, Jean-Pierre
Mariell, Yolande Moreau, and
Julie Ferrier

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 105 minutes

Distributor: Sony Pictures Classics

Director: Jean Pierre Jeunet

Executive Producer: None

Producer: Jean Pierre Jeunet, Frederic
Brillion and Gilles Legrand

Writer: Jean Pierre Jeunet and
Guillaume Laurant

Address Comments To:

Michael Barker, Tom Bernard and Marcia Bloom
Co-Presidents
Sony Pictures Classics (Sony Pictures Entertainment)
550 Madison Avenue, 8th Floor
New York, NY 10022
Phone: (212) 833-8833; Fax: (212) 833-8844
Web Page: www.sonyclassics.com
Email: Sony_Classics@spe.sony.com

Content:

(PaPa, H, Ro, Fe, C, L, VV, SS, NN, A, D, MM) Strong mixed pagan worldview in comedy about revenge against arms dealers and politics of greed, slight Romantic elements, woman makes some feminist comments, and Catholic reference as boy is punished in school by nun while she recites Scripture of Christ’s suffering; three obscenities, three profanities and one obscene gesture; strong violence, mostly comic, includes land mine kills boy’s father, man is accidentally shot in the head though he recovers, urination is depicted, jar of hornets are released to distract workers, man is a human cannonball, people’s heads are clunked together, explosions, people are tied up by arms dealers, men play Russian roulette, car crashes, and female contortionist is folded up in boxes and a refrigerator; strong sexual content includes depicted fornication is used to distract security officer, and he gets excited while watching them through a security camera, man watches a peep show, unmarried kissing, and implied fornication in another scene; upper female nudity with pasties, upper male nudity, woman in lingerie during fornication scene; alcohol consumption depicted; security guard is drugged and knocked out; and, strong miscellaneous immorality includes lying, stealing, blackmail, vigilantism, arms dealers, breaking and entering, theft, revenge.

Summary:

MICMACS is a French comedy about Bazil, an unlucky homeless man who, with the help of his band of eclectic misfits, gets to take revenge on the two weapons manufacturers who are the source of his life’s misfortunes. The movie is very funny; however, the movie contains strong sexual content, some language and themes of revenge, theft and blackmail.

Review:

MICMACS is a French comedy about Bazil, an unlucky homeless man who, with the help of an eclectic group of misfits, gets to take revenge on the two competing weapons manufacturers who are, inadvertently, the source of his life’s misfortunes.



When he was just a boy, Bazil received word his father had died from a landmine. He saw pieces of the shrapnel and the logo of the mine manufacturer. Later in life, Basil was inadvertently shot in the head while standing on the street just as a high-speed car chase raced past him. After surgery and having miraculously survived the bullet lodged in his brain, Bazil returns to where he was shot and finds the bullet shell with the logo of another weapons manufacturer on it.

Soon after his accident and recovery, Bazil is homeless and alone. That is, until he meets up with a merry band of homeless junk peddlers, who welcome him into their fold. One day while collecting junk to take back to his friends, Bazil finds himself standing between two buildings: they are the competing weapons manufacturers who are responsible for making the mine that killed his father and the bullet lodged in his head.

Bazil sets out to take revenge on the two competing arms dealers. His greatest weapon is the businessmen’s hatred toward one another. With his friends by his side, Bazil sets into motion a hilarious caper that will bring the two companies and the insidious CEOs to their knees.

MICMACS is very funny. It is a comedy caper that hearkens back to the classic days of Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton. Filled with physical comedy and a quirky story with larger-than-life characters, MICMACS has some great laugh-out-loud moments. Every character is unique and brings a nice angle to the ensemble comedy. Bazil, brilliantly played by Dany Boon, is the soul of the movie, and the actor’s physicality makes him a perfect unlikely hero who is both empathetic and funny.

However, this comedy is not without some tragedy, and that is the movie’s immoral content, chief of which is an unnecessary amount of sexual content. The depicted fornication, the implied fornication and the peep show that Bazil views tarnish what could have been a completely delightful movie. There is also some mild language, which is unnecessary to the story itself. The movie has a mostly mixed pagan worldview with elements of greed, theft and blackmail as well as a general theme of revenge, but these are handled lightly in a comedic sense that is as funny as it is far-fetched. Most discerning adults will be able to look right past those elements. Sadly, though, the sexual content is where MICMACS fails, and media-wise audiences probably will choose to laugh at more wholesome entertainment.

In Brief:

MICMACS is a French comedy about Bazil, an unlucky homeless man who gets revenge on two competing weapons manufacturers, the source of his misfortunes. After his father dies from a landmine and Bazil recovers from a stray bullet lodged in his brain, Bazil finds himself homeless and alone, until he meets up with a merry band of homeless junk peddlers. One day, Bazil finds himself standing between the two buildings of the competing weapons manufacturers. With his friends by his side, Bazil sets into motion a hilarious revenge caper that will bring the two companies to their knees.

MICMACS is very funny. It is a comedy caper that hearkens back to the classic days of Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton. The movie has a mixed pagan worldview with elements of greed, theft and blackmail as well as a revenge theme, but these are handled lightly in a comic sense that is as funny as it is far-fetched. Most discerning adults will be able to look right past those elements. However, the movie also contains strong sexual content and brief foul language. Although MICMACS succeeds as a comedy, it fails as wholesome entertainment.