MONSOON WEDDING

Celebrating Marriage and Family in India

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 22, 2002

Starring: Naseeruddin Shah, Shefali
Shetty, Vijay Raaz, Vasundhara
Das, Parvin Dabas, Lillete
Dubey, and Tilotama Shome

Genre: Comedy/Drama

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 113 minutes

Distributor: USA Films

Director: Mira Nair

Executive Producer: Jonathan Sehring and Caroline
Kaplan

Producer: Mira Nair and Caroline Baron

Writer: Sabrina Dhawan

Address Comments To:

Scott Greenstein, Chairman
USA Films
100 North Crescent Drive, Garden Level
Beverly Hills, CA 90210
Phone: (310) 385-4000
Fax: (310) 385-4408
Website: www.usafilms.net

Content:

(Pa, BB, LL, V, S, A, D, M) Slight pagan worldview of a Punjabi family wedding in India with some references to God and some moral dilemmas resolved in a solid moral fashion; 16 obscenities including some “f” words and nine profanities; some mild fighting violence and comical slapstick violence; implied adultery, sensuous dancing & discussion about a family member’s sexual abuse of two children, which is resolved in a moral way; no nudity; alcohol use; smoking; and lying.


Summary:

In MONSOON WEDDING, the Verma family of India prepares for their daughter’s arranged marriage as the monsoon rains loom over New Delhi. Though a bit overlong, MONSOON WEDDING is directed, photographed and acted with a deft touch and ends with a celebration of marriage and family, but includes some adult subject matter, including several strong obscenities.


Review:

In MONSOON WEDDING, the Verma family of India prepares for their daughter’s arranged marriage as the monsoon rains loom over New Delhi. The father of the bride, Lalit, and his wife, Pimmi, have endured the ups and down of a traditional marriage. With their daughter, Aditi, preparing to leave home, the Vermas seek comfort in their shared life together. Aditi, however, is not yet over her love affair with her older, married boss, and she begins to get cold feet the day before the ceremony.
The bride’s unmarried, intellectual cousin, Ria, notices her cousin’s apprehension. Defying convention, Ria begins to assert herself with Aditi and the rest of the family, and finally reveals a disturbing secret about Lalit’s wealthy brother-in-law, who has helped Lalit and his family survive past financial troubles. As the chaotic wedding preparations intensify, Lalit must make a choice whether to stand by Ria or his brother-in-law.
MONSOON WEDDING depicts the robust, boisterous lifestyle of a middle-class Punjabi family in India. The Punjabis are to India what the Italians are to Europe and America, according to the movie’s female director, Mira Nair – “we party hard, work hard and have a huge appetite for life.” A major part of the story, however, involves the excitable, upwardly mobile wedding coordinator, who falls in love with the Verma family’s virtuous young maid.
Though a bit overlong, MONSOON WEDDING is directed, photographed and acted with a deft touch. Interestingly, there weren’t any references to the Hindu background of these characters. In fact, the movie includes a couple borderline pleas and references to God, such as “God forbid it.” Also, although there are subplots regarding adultery and incest in the story, these dramatic conflicts are resolved in a moral fashion. In fact, the movie ends with a celebration of marriage and family, in a spirit of laughter and joy. Still, MOVIEGUIDE® must give MONSOON WEDDING an extreme caution for some of its mature subject matter, including the strong obscenities that occasionally occur.


In Brief:

In MONSOON WEDDING, the Verma family of India prepares for their daughter’s arranged marriage as the monsoon rains loom over New Delhi. The father of the bride, Lalit, and his wife, Pimmi, have endured the ups and down of a traditional marriage. As the new and old family members gather to begin the celebrations, complications arise – the bride is not yet over her love affair with her older, married boss, and an unmarried cousin reveals a dreadful secret about the wealthy brother-in-law of the bride’s father.
Though a bit overlong, MONSOON WEDDING is directed, photographed and acted with a deft touch. Interestingly, there weren’t any references to the Hindu background of these characters. In fact, the movie includes a couple borderline pleas and references to God, such as “God forbid it.” Also, although there are subplots regarding adultery and incest in the story, these dramatic conflicts are resolved in a moral fashion. In fact, the movie ends with a celebration of marriage and family, in a spirit of laughter and joy. Still, MOVIEGUIDE® must give MONSOON WEDDING an extreme caution for some of its mature subject matter, including the strong obscenities that occasionally occur