MR. BASEBALL

Content -1
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: October 02, 1992

Starring: Tom Selleck, Ken Takakura &
Aya Takanashi.

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Teenagers and adults.

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 98 minutes

Distributor: Universal Pictures

Director: Fred Schepisi

Executive Producer:

Producer: Theo Pellitier & John
Junkerman

Writer: Fred Schepisi

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Content:

(B, LL, NN, SS) The biblical premise that pride and sloth comes before the fall is marred by: 10 profanities & 13 obscenities; complete rear male nudity & partial male frontal nudity; and, fornication.


Summary:

In MR. BASEBALL, Tom Selleck stars as Jack Elliot, a rebellious, hedonistic New York Yankee who falls into a batting slump and is traded to a Japanese baseball team. The basic premise that pride and sloth come before a fall is marred by Jack's sexual conquests, a condescending attitude toward women, and unnecessary shots of Tom's backside.


Review:

In MR. BASEBALL, Tom Selleck stars as Jack Elliot, a rebellious, hedonistic New York Yankee who falls into a batting slump and is traded to a Japanese baseball team. Arriving in Nagoya, Japan, Jack soon finds that his lazy Western ways collide head-on with a culture where discipline is king. His major league arrogance is soon deflated as he tries to impose American customs in an Eastern environment. It is through this humbling process, done in a non-offensive way, that the film develops a story line. Eventually realizing that he "ain't what he used to be," Jack comes to the end of himself and gets back in shape. His hard work pays off in the climatic win over the league leader, the Giants.
The premise that pride and sloth come before a fall is the central thread developed here. However, the film is marred by Jack's sexual conquests, a condescending attitude toward women, and unnecessary shots of Tom's backside. The cinematography is good, the clash and subsequent blending of cultures is amusing, and the reconciliation that comes out of the humbling process is good. However, this film joins many others in overall mediocrity, and you may be better off spending spare time with a more edifying film message.


In Brief: