MULHOLLAND DRIVE Add To My Top 10

Back To His Old Boring Tricks or Another Typical Lynching

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: October 08, 2001

Starring: Naomi Watts, Laura Elena Harring, Ann Miller, Justin Theroux, Robert Forster, & Dan Hedaya

Genre: Mystery

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 146 minutes

Address Comments To:

Stacey Snider, Chairman
Universal Pictures
Ron Meyer, President/COO
Universal Studios
100 Universal City Plaza
Universal City, CA 91608-1085
Phone: (818) 777-1000
Web Page: www.universalstudios.com

Content:

(PaPaPa, HoHoHo, O, B, LL, VV, SSS, NNN, A, DD, MM) Extremely pagan worldview with strong, explicit lesbian homosexual content, occult elements & perhaps a moral point; 9 obscenities & 2 profanities; violent fights, beatings, car crash, & corpse; lesbian sex; full female nudity; alcohol; smoking & drugs; and, theft, lying, coercion, jealousy, & deception.

Summary:

In David Lynch’s MULHOLLAND DRIVE, a naïve young woman gets lost in lesbian lust, jealousy and self-destruction in Hollywood. There are some poignant humor, visually striking scenes and fine acting in MULHOLLAND DRIVE, but the moral points to the story get buried in the infatuation with image and illusion, not to mention explicit homosexual deviance.

Review:

After his wonderful redemptive movie THE STRAIGHT STORY, David Lynch is back to his tired old TWIN PEAKS formula of lesbian love and deceptive, quirky mystery in MULHOLLAND DRIVE. This time it appears that he has completely lost track of the plot and the critics.

MULHOLLAND DRIVE opens with a beautiful woman being driven up the street by the same name. The limo stops, and the driver turns around to shoot her. Just then some racing teenagers hit the limo, and the only one to walk away is the actress.

Meanwhile, at Los Angeles Airport, a young woman named Betty deplanes. She is the typical naïve innocent from a small town who comes to seek her fame and fortune in Hollywood. She goes to stay at her famous actress aunt’s apartment, only to find the actress from the accident hiding out there. Betty tries to help the unknown woman who calls herself Rita after noticing a poster of the famous Rita Hayworth. In searching for Rita’s memory, Betty falls in lust with Rita, they have explicit lesbian sex, and Betty goes down the path of jealousy and self-destruction.

There may be a moral point to this movie: don’t be naïve and follow your dreams into the movie industry, you will get lost. There is even a devil figure and a mysterious Pandora’s Box. However, the point gets lost in the convoluted storyline which stops abruptly, switches direction and starts again, as it does in many of David Lynch’s other movies. This time his attempt to be au currant is passé. He has done this trick once too often. It is now old hat and he doesn’t seem to have the heart for it.

There is some poignant humor in MULHOLLAND DRIVE and some visually striking scenes. The acting fits the storyline. However, the lesbian love scenes are too lascivious, and the moral point gets buried, as noted, in the infatuation with image and illusion, as well as explicit homosexual deviance.

In Brief:

Directed by David Lynch, MULHOLLAND DRIVE opens with a beautiful woman being driven up the street by the same name. The limo stops, and the driver turns around to shoot her. Just then some racing teenagers hit the limo, and the only one to walk away is the actress. At Los Angeles Airport, a young woman named Betty disembarks. She is the typical naïve innocent from a small town who comes to seek her fame and fortune in Hollywood. She goes to stay at her famous actress aunt’s apartment, only to find the actress from the accident hiding out there. Betty tries to help the unknown woman who calls herself Rita after noticing a poster of the famous Rita Heyworth. In searching for Rita’s memory, Betty falls in lust with Rita, they have explicit lesbian sex, and Betty goes down the path of jealousy and self-destruction.

There is some poignant humor in MULHOLLAND DRIVE and some visually striking scenes. The acting fits the storyline. However, the lesbian love scenes are too lascivious, and the moral points to the story get buried in the infatuation with image and illusion, not to mention explicit homosexual deviance.