NORA

Humanist Literary Icon

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: May 04, 2001

Starring: Ewan McGregor, Susan Lynch,
Peter McDonald, & Roberto
Citran

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 106 minutes

Distributor: Andora Pictures International

Director: Pat Murphy

Executive Producer: Guy Collins

Producer: Bradley Adams, Damon Bryant &
Tracey Seaeward

Writer: Pat Murphy & Gerard Stembridge

Address Comments To:

No address available.

Content:

(HH, AbAb, LLL, V, SS, NN, AA, D, M) Solid humanist worldview with statements against Christianity in a Roman Catholic context; 23 obscenities (mostly the “f” word), 9 strong profanities & 3 mild profanities; slapping; depicted fornication, masturbation & cohabitation; partial sexual nudity; alcohol use & drunkenness; smoking; and, unmarried man is strongly jealous of his live-in lover.

Summary:

NORA depicts the early years of author James Joyce’s (ULYSSES) relationship with his lifelong love, Nora Barnacle. Containing strong foul language and graphic sexuality and nudity, NORA fails to bring sufficient insight into the lives of these two important figures from literary history.

Review:

NORA depicts the early years of author James Joyce’s relationship with his lifelong love, Nora Barnacle. Passion erupts immediately, but Joyce cannot stand the stifling, repressive atmosphere of Dublin, where his nemesis, the Roman Catholic Church and Christianity, rules society. So, he and Nora pack up for Trieste, Italy, where Joyce struggles with becoming a published author while Nora tries to cope with Joyce’s insane jealousy. Eventually, they reach a sufficient level of understanding and love, just as Joyce’s career begins to blossom with the publication of his trend setting collection, THE DUBLINERS, several years before he published the controversial ULYSSES in 1922.

Although based on an acclaimed biography of Nora, whom Joyce later married in 1932 in a civil ceremony, this movie never adequately explains Nora’s love for Joyce, nor Joyce’s disturbing bouts of jealousy. The movie also fails when it comes to describing Nora as the muse responsible for Joyce’s writing, which she was. Neither Ewan McGregor as Joyce nor Susan Lynch as Nora are fully credible as these two important figures from literary history. Finally, although the movie depicts Joyce’s renunciation of Christianity, it fails to note that, despite his renunciation, Joyce’s writings retain many redemptive elements he learned as a youth. The movie also includes strong foul language and graphic sexuality and nudity.

In Brief:

NORA depicts the early years of author James Joyce’s relationship with his lifelong love, Nora Barnacle. Passion erupts, but Joyce cannot stand the stifling, repressive atmosphere of Dublin, where his nemesis, the Roman Catholic Church, rules society. So, he and Nora pack up for Trieste, Italy, where Joyce struggles with becoming a published author while Nora tries to cope with Joyce’s insane jealousy. Eventually, they reach a level of understanding and love, just as Joyce’s career begins to blossom with the publication of THE DUBLINERS, several years before he published the controversial ULYSSES in 1922.

Although based on an acclaimed biography of Nora, whom Joyce married in 1932 in a civil ceremony, this movie never explains Nora’s love for Joyce, nor Joyce’s disturbing bouts of jealousy. The movie also fails when it comes to describing Nora as the muse responsible for Joyce’s writing, which she was. Neither Ewan McGregor as Joyce nor Susan Lynch as Nora are fully credible as these two important figures from literary history. Finally, although the movie depicts Joyce’s renunciation of Christianity, it fails to note that, despite his renunciation, Joyce’s writings retain many redemptive elements he learned as a youth