NOVEMBER

Only Love Remains

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: July 22, 2005

Starring: Courtney Cox, James Le Gros,
Anne Archer, Nora Dunn,
Michael Ealy, Nick Offerman,
and Matthew Carey

Genre: Psychological Thriller

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 89 minutes

Distributor: Sony Pictures Classics

Director: Greg Harrison

Executive Producer: Jonathan Sehring, Caroline
Kaplan and John Sloss

Producer: Danielle Renfrew, Gary Winick
and Jake Abraham

Writer: Benjamin Brand

Address Comments To:

Michael Barker and Tom Bernard
Co-Presidents
Sony Pictures Classics
(Sony Pictures Entertainment)
550 Madison Avenue, 8th Floor
New York, NY 10022
Phone: (212) 833-8833
Web Page: http://www.sonyclassics.com
Email: Sony_Classics@spe.sony.com

Content:

(H, B, L, VVV, S, A, D, M) Lightly humanist psychological thriller that's more like a disturbing experimental psycho-drama, but there is a positive message about love at the end; three or four "f" words and two light profanities; very strong violence with some blood includes point blank shootings, pool of blood under one corpse, bloody wounds on other corpses, sudden images of blood, images of murdered corpses, light drips a few lines of blood, blood coming out of one person's ear, and sudden violent noises that are very loud; implied fornication and cheating and unmarried couple lies in bed; no nudity; alcohol use; smoking; and, cohabitation, lying and cheating.

Summary:

NOVEMBER is a low-budget psychological thriller about a female photographer who begins to question the event's surrounding her boyfriend's murder. The acting in NOVEMBER is very good (especially by Courtney Cox of TV's FRIENDS), but the story and plot are not fully developed and contain strong objectionable content.

Review:

NOVEMBER, starring Courtney Cox of TV's FRIENDS, is billed as a psychological thriller, but it's also an experimental mood piece designed to provoke a thoughtful attitude rather than just some thrills and chills.

Cox plays Sophie, a thirtysomething photographer suffering the traumatic murder of her live-in boyfriend, Hugh. While Sophie waited in the car, a late-night stop at a corner store on Nov. 7 turned into an armed robbery leaving four people dead.

One day while teaching her photography class, a slide mysteriously appears in the projector's carousel. The slide shows an external photo of the corner store where Hugh's murder occurred. As Sophie investigates the matter further, she is forced to relive the event from different angles. More strange events occur, drawing into question what really happened that night.

The acting in NOVEMBER is very good (especially by Courtney Cox who carries the drama), but the story and plot are not fully developed. Consequently, most viewers may come away feeling cheated when the director finally reveals what's really happening.

NOVEMBER also contains some strong scenes of violence, a tiny amount of strong foul language and several very loud, annoying sudden bangs and noises designed for shock effect. Adding to the cheap sound effects tricks are some artsy shots and edits. The filmmakers should have paid more attention to the script than such cheap, artsy cinematic effects.

Finally, the movie reveals early on that Sophie has had an affair with a co-worker. Despite this, one of the movie's messages at the end is a warning that everyone, including Sophie, should pay more attention to those they truly love, because they could be gone in a moment. In the end, only the love remains. That's a positive, provocative message that the filmmakers also should have concentrated on more strongly throughout the whole picture rather than just the third act.

In Brief:

NOVEMBER, a low-budget psychological thriller, stars Courtney Cox as Sophie, a thirtysomething photographer suffering the traumatic murder of her live-in boyfriend, Hugh. A late-night stop at a corner store on Nov. 7 turns into an armed robbery leaving four people dead, including Hugh. One day while teaching her photography class, a slide mysteriously appears in the projector's carousel. The slide shows an external photo of the corner store where Hugh's murder occurred. As Sophie investigates further, she is forced to relive the event from different angles. More strange events occur, drawing into question what really happened that night.

NOVEMBER is not just a psychological thriller; it's also an experimental mood piece designed to provoke thoughtful attitudes rather than just thrills and chills. The acting in NOVEMBER is very good (especially by Courtney Cox), but the story and plot are not fully developed. Consequently, most viewers may come away feeling cheated when the director finally reveals what's really happening. NOVEMBER also contains some strong scenes of violence, brief foul language and several very loud, annoying sudden noises designed for shock effect. The filmmakers should have paid more attention to the script than cheap cinematic effects.