NUNS ON THE RUN

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: March 16, 1990

Starring: Eric Idle, Robbie Coltrane, &
Janet Suzman

Genre: Comedy

Audience:

Rating: R

Runtime: Approximately 90 minutes

Distributor: 20th Century Fox/Handmade
Films

Director: Jonathan Lynn

Executive Producer:

Producer: Michael White

Writer: Jonathan Lynn

Address Comments To:

Content:

Several profanities and obscenities; nudity, crude sexual references and fornication; and, blasphemy.

Summary:


Review:

Brian (ex-Monte Pythoner Eric Idle) and Charlie are friends who work as bank robbers and car thieves for small-time crime boss Casey. The work is stressful and offers no benefits, they both agree, but the con men can't find a new occupation because Mr. Casey would kill them. So, they plan to bilk their gangster employer out of millions and go to Rio De Janeiro.

The money they take belongs to a local Chinese drug ring called the Triads, and the bumbling Brain and Charlie run out of gas as they make their getaway. They duck into a convent to hide and subsequently pose as nuns (rather homely ones at that), since they are now wanted by their boss' men, the Triads gang, and the police. (Note that the Bible clearly states that "A woman must not wear men's clothing, nor a man wear women's clothing, for the LORD your God detests anyone who does this" in Deuteronomy 22:5.)

Needless to say, two female impersonators at a convent make for many embarrassing and humorous moments. Further complicating matters is Faith, Brain's girlfriend whom he wants to take with him to Brazil, since Mr. Casey will use her to find him. Eventually, the nun impersonators are found out. A mad chase to the airport ensues, with Casey's men, the Triads, the police, and some very angry nuns in hot pursuit.

The humor in the movie is mostly slapstick. Some of it works and some of it does not. There is also crude, bathroom variety humor. Worse still are several scenes where blasphemous and derogatory statements are made about Jesus Christ and God the Father. In one particularly offensive scene, the Trinity is thoroughly ridiculed. Nuns and priests are portrayed as rather immoral and empty-headed.

With associate producer and ex-Beatle George Harrison, a practitioner of New Age religion, it is no wonder than Christianity takes a beating in the film. It would seem that Christians are a popular target for the entertainment industry, yet if this film belittled Jews or blacks there would be a well-deserved public outcry.

Perhaps 1 Peter 4:12-13 should be our response. "Dear friends, do not be surprised at the painful trial you are suffering, as though something strange were happening to you. But rejoice that you participate in the suffering of Christ, so that you may be overjoyed when his glory is revealed."

RECOMMENDED ACTION: You may want to voice your complaints by writing or calling Twentieth Century Fox, 15250 Ventura Blvd., Suite 700, Sherman Oaks, CA 91403 (818) 995-7750.

In Brief: