ONCE IN A LIFETIME: THE EXTRAORDINARY STORY OF THE NEW YORK COSMOS Add To My Top 10

The Rise and Fall of American Soccer

Content -1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: July 07, 2006

Starring: Interviews with: Shen Messing, Franz Beckenbauer, Giorgio Chinaglia, Ahmed Ertegun, Mark Ross, Carlos Alberto

Genre: Documentary

Audience: Adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 1 hr. 33 min.

Address Comments To:

Content:

(Pa, Cap, L, V, S, NN, A, M), Light pagan worldview placing great importance on sports with capitalist portrayed in positive light for trying to make soccer popular in the U.S.A.; three obscenities; no violence apart from soccer competition; sexual immorality of star players implied; rear male still images of one player who posed nude for a magazine, some locker room images of players without shirts on; story told of players drinking excessively; no smoking or drugs; and, people interviewed had less than kind things to say about each other.

Summary:

ONCE IN A LIFETIME: THE EXTRAORDINARY STORY OF THE NEW YORK COSMOS is a documentary about how former Warner Communications head Steve Ross gambled on a effort make soccer a major spectator sport in the United States. It is marred by still photos of one of the early players posing nude, a few obscenities and references to immoral lifestyles of some star players.

Review:

In the 1970s former Warner Communications head Steve Ross gambled on a effort make soccer a major spectator sport in the United States. ONCE IN A LIFETIME: THE EXTRAORDINARY STORY OF THE NEW YORK COSMOS is a documentary about how that trial balloon was blown up and popped.

Initial attempts to create all American professional soccer teams failed because there were no star American players. The only press exposure they could get was to pose nude in magazines. Only 300 people, mostly friends and family of players, would show up at the early New York Cosmos games. The league rapidly went from Yankee Stadium down to venues not fit for a decent high school football game.

Then came the stars. Ross and staff managed to sign the Babe Ruth of international soccer: Pele of Brazil. The international press swarmed and attendance soared. The games moved back into large stadiums and additional international stars were drawn to the North American Soccer League. Large stadiums actually filled to capacity.

The balloon popped when ABC signed up to telecast a season of soccer and got ratings too low to qualify for last place. Without a lucrative television contract the league imploded.

If you’re a great soccer fan the tale is like a dream with top players from around the world playing for one glamorous team. But the dream ends in a series of conflicts, mistakes and misjudgments.

The film contains still photos of one of the early players posing nude and is marred by a few obscenities and references to immoral lifestyles of some star players. Much of the footage from the 1970s looks pale compared to today’s standards in sports broadcasting. The people interviewed are wonderful proof that memories differ widely about events 20-to-30 years old.

The question is, “Who cares?” The movie will probably play to small audiences in small theatres because Americans still don’t care that much about soccer and the world doesn’t care that much about American soccer.

In Brief:

ONCE IN A LIFETIME: THE EXTRAORDINARY STORY OF THE NEW YORK COSMOS is a documentary about how former Warner Communications head Steve Ross gambled on a effort make soccer a major spectator sport in the United States. If you’re a great soccer fan the tale is like a dream with top players from around the world playing for one glamorous team. But the dream ends in a series of conflicts, mistakes and misjudgments.

The film contains still photos of one of the early players posing nude and is marred by a few obscenities and references to immoral lifestyles of some star players. Much of the footage from the 1970s looks pale compared to today’s standards in sports broadcasting. The people interviewed are wonderful proof that memories differ widely about events 20-to-30 years old. The question is, “Who cares?” The movie will probably play to small audiences in small theatres because Americans still don’t care that much about soccer and the world doesn’t care that much about American soccer.