ONG BAK 2

Disappointing, Abhorrent Ending

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: October 23, 2009

Starring: Tony Jaa, Primrata Dej-Udom,
Santisuk Promsiri, Pattama
Panthong, Saranyu Wongkrajang,
Sorapong Chatree. Nirut
Sirijunya, and Petchtai
Wongkamlao

Genre: Martial Arts Thriller

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 115 minutes

Distributor: Magnet Releasing/Magnolia
Pictures

Director: Tony Jaa Panom Yeerum and
Panna Rittikrai

Executive Producer: Somsak Techaratanaprasert

Producer: None

Writer: Ake Eamchuen

Address Comments To:

Bill Banowski, CEO, Magnolia Pictures (Magnet Releasing)
1614 West 5th St.
Austin, TX 78703
Eamon Bowles, President, Magnolia Pictures (Magnet Releasing)
43 West 27th St., 7th Floor
New York, NY 10001
Phone: (212) 924-6701; Fax: (212) 924-6742
Website: www.magpictures.com; Email: info@ magpictures.com

Content:

(PaPaPa, FRFRFR, L, VVV, N, MMM) Very strong Buddhist pagan worldview with very strong false theology about karma and reincarnation in a revenge plot; two light obscenities; some very strong violence and plenty of action violence with some blood includes much martial arts hand-to-hand combat with kicking and flips, people shot with arrows, much sword fighting, stabbings, battles, and falling; no sex; upper male nudity; no alcohol; no smoking; and, strong revenge theme and slavery, tyranny, betrayal, and banditry.

Summary:

ONG BAK 2: THE BEGINNING is a prequel from Thailand that tells the story of an earlier reincarnation of the modern-day hero from the first movie, who seeks revenge against an evil king in the middle 1400s. The cinematography in ONG BAK 2 is eye popping and the action is thrilling, but the ending cheats viewers with a downbeat resolution containing abhorrent, senseless Buddhist theology about karma and reincarnation.

Review:

ONG BAK 2: THE BEGINNING is a prequel from Thailand that tells the story of an earlier reincarnation of the modern-day hero from the first movie. As such, it has a downbeat Buddhist ending that talks overtly about karma and reincarnation. The ending is both depressing and theologically abhorrent.

The movie opens in 1431 with an evil king killing the parents of a young boy named Tien. Slave traders capture Tien. When he rebels, they throw him into a water pit with a crocodile, but a bandit leader attacking the slave traders throws Tien a knife to defend himself.

Tien survives. The bandit leader raises him like a son, training him in all the ways of mortal combat. When Tien grows up, he becomes the new bandit leader, but decides to leave and seek his revenge against the evil king.

The cinematography in ONG BAK 2 is eye popping. The exciting action culminates, however, in a downbeat ending where karma determines the fate of the characters. Also, a narration at the end asks viewers to put their trust in future reincarnation.

Thus, the ending not only promotes abhorrent Buddhist theology, it also cheats viewers out of a proper resolution to the story. Ultimately, despite the brilliant photography and the elaborate and exciting martial arts action, the ending is a huge letdown.

ONG BAK 2 also contains some very strong violence and a couple light obscenities.

In Brief:

ONG BAK 2: THE BEGINNING is a prequel from Thailand that tells the story of an earlier reincarnation of the modern-day hero from the first movie. It opens in 1431 with an evil king killing the father of a young boy named Tien. Slave traders capture Tien. When he rebels, they throw him into a water pit with a crocodile. A bandit leader attacking the slave traders throws Tien a knife and he survives. The bandit leader raises Tien like a son, training him in all the ways of mortal combat. When Tien grows up, however, he leaves to seek his revenge against the evil king.

The cinematography in ONG BAK 2 is eye popping. The thrilling action culminates, however, in a downbeat ending where karma determines the fate of the characters. Also, a narration at the end asks viewers to put their trust in future reincarnation. Thus, the ending not only promotes abhorrent Buddhist theology, it also cheats viewers out of a proper resolution to the story. Ultimately, despite the brilliant photography, the ending is a huge letdown. ONG BAK 2 also contains very strong violence and a couple of obscenities.