ONG-BAK: THE THAI WARRIOR

Relentless Action

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 11, 2005

Starring: Tony Jaa

Genre: Martial Arts Action Thriller

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 105 minutes

Distributor: Magnolia Pictures

Director: Pracha Pinkaew

Executive Producer: Somsak Techaratanaprasert

Producer: Pracha Pinkaew and Sukanya
Vongsthapat

Writer: Suphachai Sithiampham

Address Comments To:

Magnolia Pictures
115 West 27th Street, 8th Floor
New York, NY 10001
Phone: (212) 924-6701
Fax: (212) 924-6742
Website: www.magpictures.com
Email: info@ magpictures.com

Content:

(PaPaPa, FRFRFR, B, H, LL, VVV, S, N, A, DD, MM) Very strong pagan Buddhist worldview with a somewhat moral defeat of humanist evil and an implicit defense of religious belief, and humanist gangster villain declares his hatred of religion and says, “I am God”; 19 obscenities (including a few “f” words); sometimes very strong martial arts violence and much action violence includes men climb tree and throw others off tree in order to get flag during some kind of village holiday, punching, kicking, fighter hits another fighter with chairs, tables, sign, and other objects, mini-cabs wreck during chase scene, some explosions, hero hits villains in head with his elbows and forearms, blow to top of man’s skull results in bloody wound, arms broken, guns fired, man shot, hero delivers death blow to villain with his knees, large statue falls on man and destroys heavy wood platform, debris pins man; villain unbuttons blouse and kisses woman as she is lying down but stops because she doesn’t respond; upper male nudity in some fight scenes, rear male nudity in one scene, and woman shown in bra; alcohol use in fight club scenes; smoking, evil man snorts cocaine, discussion mentions the fact that evil man sells drugs, and evil man rubs woman’s face in cocaine, giving her an overdose; and, stealing, confidence game, cheating at cards, illegal street fighting, and gambling, some of which is rebuked.

Summary:

ONG-BAK: THE THAI WARRIOR is a very entertaining martial arts action thriller from Thailand, but it contains strong Buddhist content, lots of violence, strong obscenities, gambling, and drug abuse. Tony Jaa stars as a talented martial arts acolyte sent by his rural village to Bangkok to retrieve the head of a sacred statue stolen by a gangster.

Review:

ONG-BAK: THE THAI WARRIOR is an entertaining martial arts thriller from Thailand, but it contains strong Buddhist content and plenty of violence.

The exciting story is about a rural village which sends Ting, the local expert in martial arts, to retrieve the stolen head of its sacred Buddha statue. A village elder gives Ting a letter for the elder’s son in Bangkok. In Bangkok, Ting finds that the elder’s son has changed his name to George. George lives as a petty thief on the streets and works with a young streetwise woman named Muay. When George finds out how well Ting can fight, he promises to help him only if Ting will win money for him in an illegal street fight.

The man who stole the statue’s head turns out to be linked to a gangster who peddles stolen antiquities. The gangster also spends his evenings betting on the illegal street fights. Ting persistently pursues the gangsters and the sacred village artifact, leading to amazing chase scenes and fight scenes.

Tony Jaa stars in ONG-BAK as Ting, and he performs many stupendous stunts and martial arts moves, like leaping over small cars and climbing and jumping over and off the heads of the many gangsters chasing him. The fighting and chasing is virtually relentless, and the violence is sometimes bone crunching. The story also contains a few strong obscenities and a plot involving the worship of Buddhist idols.

At one point, the head gangster declares to Ting that the only religion he cares about is himself. “I am God,” the gangster adds. Thus, it is Ting’s persistent Buddhist faith and courage that ultimately defeats the humanist forces of darkness.

In Brief:

ONG-BAK: THE THAI WARRIOR is a very entertaining martial arts action thriller from Thailand, but it contains strong Buddhist content and plenty of violence. A rural village sends Ting, the local expert in martial arts, to retrieve the stolen head of its sacred Buddha statue. In Bangkok, Ting finds that the man who stole the statue’s head turns out to be linked to a gangster who peddles stolen antiquities. The gangster also spends his evenings betting on illegal street fights. Despite his amazing abilities as a fighter, Ting eventually needs help from another man from his village, who has become a petty thief in Bangkok. Together, they persistently pursue the gangsters and the sacred village artifact, leading to amazing chases and many fight scenes.

Tony Jaa stars in ONG-BAK as Ting and he performs many stupendous stunts and martial arts moves, like leaping over small cars and climbing and jumping over and off the heads of the many gangsters chasing him. The fighting and chasing is virtually relentless, and the violence is sometimes bone crunching. The story also contains strong obscenities, brief drug use, gambling, and a plot involving the worship of Buddhist idols.