PAGE ONE: INSIDE THE NEW YORK TIMES Add To My Top 10

Raging Against the Dying Light

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: June 24, 2011

Starring: David Carr

Genre: Documentary

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 88 minutes

Address Comments To:

Bill Banowski, CEO, Magnolia Pictures (Magnet Releasing)
1614 West 5th St.
Austin, TX 78703
Eamon Bowles, President, Magnolia Pictures (Magnet Releasing)
43 West 27th St., 7th Floor
New York, NY 10001
Phone: (212) 924-6701; Fax: (212) 924-6742
Website: www.magpictures.com; Email: info@ magpictures.com

Content:

(HH, PCPC, APAP, B, LL, VV, S, DD, MM) Strong humanist, secular worldview promoting the liberal, humanist New York Times, with a politically correct, biased view against American soldiers by showing only the negative, though documentary mostly focuses on how the Times has been challenged by the Internet Age of today’s journalism and blogosphere, plus some slightly positive references to one man’s now stable family life; about 20 obscenities and profanities (mostly “f” words emanating from one particular writer); shocking but brief violent footage from the War on Terror in Afghanistan; brief sexual references in regards to a scandalous story; no nudity; no alcohol use; smoking and discussion of media columnist David Carr’s past battle with crack addiction, which has left him looking the worse for wear although he is a recovering addict; and, movie focuses on one story showing real-life video footage of American troops shooting Afghan civilians as it discusses the WikiLeaks scandal surrounding that footage, a typical one-sided presentation view of the American military from the secular and liberal “news” media.

Summary:

PAGE ONE: INSIDE THE NEW YORK TIMES offers a broad look at a year in the life of America’s most prominent newspaper, focusing on the challenges it faces in the Internet Age. PAGE ONE is fast-paced and informative, but it’s mostly a secular view of the newspaper that includes some strong foul language, brief lewd references and a one-sided, negative news story about American troops in Afghanistan.

Review:

PAGE ONE: INSIDE THE NEW YORK TIMES offers viewers a broad and fairly incisive look at a year in the life of America’s most prominent newspaper. The overarching theme is the battle for even this print legend to survive the onslaught of new media and changing times, in which many other newspapers have either shut down or been forced to make massive layoffs.

Among the other events portrayed in intercutting storylines are the philosophical battles over what stories merit front-page status each day, as well as how to handle a controversial story like the Wikileaks war footage scandal. While the paper is portrayed with immense respect overall, the moviemakers provide a sense that the paper has been slipping in respect, along with the overall print media industry. Also, their movie focuses in part on the major errors and scandals in the 1990s and 2000s, such as the Jayson Blair plagiarism scandal and reporter Judith Miller’s fight to keep sources secret during the run-up to the Iraq War, which the moviemakers imply enabled the war to occur and grow bigger.

While it’s understood that the Times is a secular news institution, the movie doesn’t show any stories that mock faith or Christianity, even as any astute media observer would know that the paper and its staffers are largely secular humanists. That said, it does spend some time focusing on the controversial Wikileaks footage showing American troops shooting Afghan civilians. This reflects the Times’ own bias against the American military. The Times never passes up a chance to report on some incident that makes America’s troops look bad, while ignoring all the good the troops do in fighting evil, promoting liberty and even helping innocent civilians and children.

The pace in PAGE ONE is fast yet informative and the personalities are colorful, especially foul-mouthed media columnist David Carr, who overcame crack addiction to land his post and become a stable father. Overall, PAGE ONE is a movie that provides insights into an institution that has heretofore remained largely unknown due to its ivory tower status.

The movie’s strong (though not constant) foul language, brief sex references and negative view of American troops in Afghanistan require extreme caution.

In Brief:

PAGE ONE: INSIDE THE NEW YORK TIMES offers a broad look at a year in the life of America’s most prominent newspaper. The overarching theme is the battle for even this print legend to survive the onslaught of new media and changing times, which have forced other newspapers to shut down or make massive layoffs. Among the other events portrayed in intercutting storylines are philosophical battles over what stories merit front-page status each day, as well as how to handle a controversial story like the Wikileaks war footage scandal. While the paper is portrayed with immense respect, the moviemakers provide a sense that the paper has been slipping in respect, along with other news media.

The pace is fast, yet informative. The personalities are colorful, especially foul-mouthed media columnist David Carr, who overcame crack addiction to land his post and become a stable father. PAGE ONE provides insights into the inner workings of a closed institution. However, the movie contains strong foul language and brief lewd references. It also focuses on a story giving a one-sided, negative view of American troops in Afghanistan. MOVIEGUIDE® advises extreme caution for PAGE ONE.