PARIS Add To My Top 10

Celebrating the City of Lights

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: September 18, 2009

Starring: Juliet Binoche, Romain Duris, Mélanie Laurent, Fabrice Luchini, Albert Dupontel Francois Cluzet, Karin Viard, and Gilles Lellouche

Genre: Drama

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 124 minutes

Distributor: IFC Films

Director: Cédric Klapisch

Executive Producer: None

Producer: Bruno Levy

Writer: Cédric Klapisch

Address Comments To:

Jonathan Sehring, President, IFC Films/IFC Entertainment
Joshua Sapan, President/CEO, Rainbow Media Holdings LLC
(Independent Film Channel/IFC Films/IFC First Take/AMC/WE)
11 Penn Plaza
New York, NY 10001
Phone: (212) 324-8500
Website: www.rainbow-media.com

Content:

(PaPa, Ro, B, C, LLL, VV, S, N, AA, D, M) Strong, somewhat mixed pagan worldview with light Romantic elements and light moral elements reflecting the vestiges of Europe and France’s Christian history; at least 48 obscenities (including many “f” words), zero profanities and sick man vomits; brief strong violence when a character is killed after motorcycle slams into car and cycle rider goes flying, and light violence when fight breaks out as man gets angry at another man for badly humiliating a woman; scenes of implied fornication, middle-aged professor has an affair with a young student, unmarried woman invites unmarried man to her place, and a few lewd references; brief upper male nudity and women in bra in two or so scenes; alcohol use and a scene with drunkenness; smoking; and, rude behavior and man humiliates a woman in public (probably out of jealousy).

Summary:

PARIS is a touching French movie that focuses on a young Parisian with a diseased heart, his older sister and the people around them. PARIS is sometimes moving and well acted, but there are too many characters and subplots, with plenty of strong foul language and some sexual content.

Review:

PARIS is a touching French movie that focuses on Pierre, a young Parisian with a diseased sick heart, and his older sister, Elise. Elise and her three children move in with Pierre to take care of him. The movie details their contacts with people in the neighborhood, including a rugged fishmonger and his colleagues working in the local outdoor market, a female bakery owner, a pretty young woman across the street, and a middle-aged college who develops an obsession for the young woman. As the brother gets sicker and waits for a heart transplant, the movie delves into the private lives of these other people.

PARIS is sometimes moving and well acted, but there are too many characters and subplots. The primary message of this movie is to enjoy everyday life while you live it, especially if you live in a beautiful, magnificent city like Paris. Thus, at the end of the movie, the brother decides that people should stop taking their lives and the City of Lights for granted.

This is a positive message that promotes an attitude of gratitude, but it’s also a bit Romantic. PARIS the movie also contains plenty of strong foul language and sexual immorality (which earned it an R rating from the MPAA*), so extreme caution is warranted.

* MPAA stands for Motion Picture Association of America, which is the advocacy group owned by the six major movie studios in Hollywood that attaches ratings to all the major movies released in the United States.

In Brief:

PARIS is a touching French movie that focuses on Pierre, a young Parisian with a diseased heart, and his older sister, Elise. Elise and her three children move in with Pierre to take care of him. The movie details their contacts with people in the neighborhood, including a rugged fishmonger and his colleagues working in the local outdoor market, a female bakery owner, a pretty young woman across the street, and a middle-aged college professor who develops an obsession for the young woman. As the brother gets sicker while waiting for a heart transplant, the movie delves into the private lives of these other people.

PARIS is sometimes moving and well acted, but there are too many characters and subplots. The movie’s primary message is to enjoy life while you live it, especially if you live in a beautiful city like Paris. Thus, at the end of the movie, the brother decides people should stop taking their lives and the city for granted. This is a positive message inspiring gratitude, but it’s a bit Romantic. PARIS the movie also contains plenty of strong foul language and sexual references, so extreme caution is warranted.