PETE'S CHRISTMAS

Where’s the Story of Christmas?

Content +1
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: November 08, 2013

Starring: Zachary Gordon, Bailee
Madison, Bruce Dern, Molly
Parker, Rick Roberts, Wesley
Morgan, Peter DaCunha,
Marshall Williams, Jacob
Kraemer

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Older children and adults

Rating: TV-G

Runtime: 90 minutes

Distributor: The Hallmark Channel

Director: Nisha Canatra

Executive Producer: Jason Netter, Nisha Canatra,
Andrew Austin, David Manion,
Louis J. Grieci II, Chris
Harrington, Aaron Tucker

Producer: Heather Puttock, Michael
Wright

Writer: Peter McKay, Greg Rossen,
Brian Sawyer

Address Comments To:

Bill Abbott, President/CEO, Crown Media Holdings
Elizabeth Yost, Vice President of Development, The Hallmark Channel
12700 Ventura Boulevard
Studio City, CA 91604
Phone: (818) 755-2400; Fax: (818) 755-2486
Website: www.hallmarkchannel.com

Content:

(BB, C, Pa, FR, V, M) Strong moral worldview with some Christmas carols but focused on a magical plot device that causes a boy to relive Christmas every day until he gets his attitude together; no foul language; roughhousing type violence such as football game, blocking, tackling, snowball fights, tree falls on boy then falls on grandfather; husband and wife kiss several times; no nudity; no drinking; no smoking or drugs; and, lying but rebuked, meanness but rebuked, dysfunctional family but cured.


Summary:

In PETE’S CHRISTMAS, an overlooked middle child in a dysfunctional family magically experiences Christmas again and again until he can learn how to solve his problems. PETE’S CHRISTMAS has a lot of heart, with some terrific moral messages, but Jesus is missing and the story has a magical plot device.


Review:

PETE’S CHRISTMAS is GROUNDHOG DAY on Christmas, for those who remember that great comedy with Bill Murray.



Pete is the overlooked middle child. So much so that his parents forget to get him a Christmas present. His football playing older brother, Jake, and his brilliant younger brother both make fun of Pete. The football player brothers across the street like to tackle him and attack him with snowballs because he is such a whimp. Pete’s father and grandfather don’t get along, and his mother is always blissfully joyous. When his older brother shorts out the Christmas tree lights, Pete tries to stop it, and the tree falls on him. The Christmas dinner is ruined by the electrical outage, so they have to go to a sleazy restaurant for hamburgers.



In other words, this is a dysfunctional family celebrating a dysfunctional Christmas.
The one bright spot is a new neighbor, Katie, played by Bailee Madison, who tells Pete to look up. At the end of the first day of the disastrous Christmas, Pete’s grandfather gives him an empty box. When he wakes up the next day, it’s Christmas all over again. As the Christmases re-occur, Pete learns how to deal with all the problems. He especially learns that it’s not what you get out of the box, but what you put into it. He even finds ways to reconcile each member of his family with each other.



PETE’S CHRISTMAS has a lot of heart. Also, it’s got some terrific messages, including the fact that your attitude is more important than your accomplishments. However, the movie begs for a reference to Jesus, which never comes. After all, Jesus is the reason for the season. Bailee Madison’s character, Katie, hints at it, as does one of the Christmas carols sung in the movie, but like several contemporary movies and television programs, the absence of prayer and praise leaves a big hole in the movie.



Aside from that, there is a weird magical plot device. The Bible tells us we die once and then comes the judgment. We don’t live the same day over and over and correct our mistakes by doing so. We correct our mistakes by accepting the free gift of forgiveness God offers us through the birth, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. The good news of Jesus is much better than the works Pete must do to overcome his problems.



By the way, GROUNDHOG DAY handled the similar plot device with much more wit and wisdom.


In Brief:

PETE’S CHRISTMAS is GROUNDHOG DAY on Christmas. Pete is the overlooked middle child. His parents forget to get him a Christmas present. His older brother, Jake, and his brilliant younger brother both make fun of Pete. Pete’s father and grandfather don’t get along, and his mother is always blissfully joyous. When his older brother shorts out the Christmas tree lights, the tree falls on Pete. The Christmas dinner is ruined by the electrical snafu, so they go to a sleazy restaurant for hamburgers. When Pete wakes up the next day, it’s Christmas all over again. As the Christmases re-occur, Pete learns how to deal with all the problems.



PETE’S CHRISTMAS has a lot of heart. And, it’s got some terrific moral messages. However, the movie begs for a reference to Jesus, which never comes. After all, Jesus is the reason for the season. Bailee Madison’s character hints at it, as does one of the Christmas carols sung in the movie. However, like several contemporary movies and television programs, the absence of prayer and praise leaves a big hole in the movie.